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STUDYFORM
22 Sep 13 20:39
Joined:
Date Joined: 26 Jan 05
| Topic/replies: 20,558 | Blogger: STUDYFORM's blog
2 that come to mind are:
Damp Squid - instead of Damp Squib (which is a small explosive or firework)
Chomping at the Bit - rather than Champing.

Also - the worst spelling mistake I ever saw.....
Sent to me by an Employment Agent a few years ago when writing the job description...
Ofey (instead of Au Fait).
He had a fecking job and I didn't!!!!!
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Report Aunty Post September 24, 2013 9:35 AM BST
Spelling Police..... *daughter's*

Actually I have to check that as I think she says "I go York"!
Report li September 24, 2013 10:43 AM BST
Nervy does not mean nervous.
Report MisterBadger September 24, 2013 11:58 AM BST
too many to list, but two of my pet hates are:

"the proof's in the pudding"... no it isn't, but the proof of the pudding is in the eating

"gone to ground"... used routinely by football commentators to indicate that a player has fallen over or been pushed over and ended up on the ground - the original meaning of the phrase is to go into hiding or disappear down a burrow or fox hole... which, frankly, I wish these empty-headed pundits would do  Angry
Report screaming from beneaththewaves September 24, 2013 4:38 PM BST
"The exception that proves the rule" means that the exception tests the rule, not that it somehow shows the rule to be true.

"Prove" in this case has the same meaning as a "proving flight", i.e. a test flight (German "probieren", English "probe"). The letters b and v are often interchangeable among European languages.
Report judorick September 24, 2013 5:04 PM BST
"All that glisters is not gold"

so many people say 'glitters' Angry
Report Pandorica September 24, 2013 7:05 PM BST
Not really the under the same umbrella as the rest here but the newspaper report above reminded me of one I read in the Bury Times years and years ago.
Following the report of an intruder, PC Wolstenholme said in court, "I pulled out my truncheon and radioed for help".
Report kincsem September 24, 2013 7:13 PM BST
It's a vicious circus. Confused
Report STUDYFORM September 24, 2013 7:18 PM BST
Another Football (and other sports) one, though it probably isn't being grammatically wrong;
"In the context of this game"
It doesn't really mean anything.

Also. Charity begins at home.
This is actually -
Charity begins at home, but shouldn't end there.

Which kind of changes the whole meaning.

Like "Money is the root of all evil".
This should be
"THE LOVE OF money is the root of all evil".
Report Greg_Gory September 24, 2013 7:34 PM BST
STUDYFORM     22 Sep 13 23:11 
In the right places of course.

Pacific annoys me too.


It's Pacifically
Specific  Laugh
Report sheppy123 September 24, 2013 10:32 PM BST
I find the words "Making Love" in songs quite annoying. "Doggy style" would be a nice change!Happy
Report Hank Hill September 24, 2013 10:52 PM BST
I have to confess to using the "I'm good" one I'm afraid Danno. Blame the American wife SillyLaugh
Report Emden September 25, 2013 5:46 PM BST
Chomping at the Bit - rather than Champing.

Chomping at the bit is perfectly fine grammar.
Report liamcol September 25, 2013 5:50 PM BST
"It's all downhill from here", may mean things are going to get easier, or harder, depending on the context.
Report Muntz Street September 25, 2013 5:54 PM BST
I've seen "pre-madonna" used on here a few times
Report naydam September 25, 2013 6:10 PM BST
Aunty, are you sure that you've got that apostrophe right? You've had two goes, but there IS a third alternative, bearing in mind that you seem to have more than one daughter. Blush

I've got me tin 'at on just in case I'm wrong! Laugh
Report naydam September 25, 2013 6:12 PM BST
Hmmmm. The quantity of daughters seems a bit ambiguous. Any chance of a quick count? Happy
Report geos1 September 25, 2013 6:50 PM BST
I can't stand  good ideal being used when they mean good idea,popular around the Bristol region
Report Emden September 25, 2013 6:52 PM BST
instead of specific say pacific

instead of kettle say kekkle
Report MisterBadger September 25, 2013 7:05 PM BST
I can't stand  good ideal being used when they mean good idea,popular around the Bristol region  LaughLaughLaugh
Report geos1 September 25, 2013 7:07 PM BST
Jamaican's say kekkle also mekkle instead of metal
Report STUDYFORM September 25, 2013 7:11 PM BST
I've had to do a bit of research into that, Emden.
It seems it used to be "champing", but "chomping" has over the years, become more acceptable.


So I don't feel corrected Mischief
Report sheppy123 September 25, 2013 7:17 PM BST
I hate it when people start using words that have been popularized in films such as Wayne's World.

Kerching drives me MAD!Angry
Report Emden September 25, 2013 7:22 PM BST
mince sauce instead of mint sauce
Report Greg_Gory September 25, 2013 7:39 PM BST
Abominal Snowman Mischief
Report Greg_Gory September 25, 2013 7:39 PM BST
Febuary
Report BigU2fan September 25, 2013 8:03 PM BST
my worst examples are:
Words ending with 'ing' e.g. something or nothing. Young people pronounce them with a K on the end of the word instead of the G. To go along with this they substitute the 'th' with 'f' to get somefink or nofink. I even caught an English school teacher speaking like this at an open evening a few year back.
Report sheppy123 September 25, 2013 8:15 PM BST
Hey BigU2fan, I couldn't agree more! I know somebody that speaks just like that!
Report Hank Hill September 25, 2013 8:45 PM BST
My wife has ruined me! I remembered some more. I also say runnin, shootin, jumpin etc CryCry
Report STUDYFORM September 25, 2013 10:23 PM BST
Oh yes, I've just remembered another very irritating one.

Hey. when what is actually meant is EH.

Eh?
Report dixie September 25, 2013 10:48 PM BST
Plain sailing.

Plane sailing is the simplest form of navigation applicable to distances of < 600 nm.  The curvature of the Earth can be ignored, and the Earth's surface can be considered to be a plane.
Report lmfao September 25, 2013 10:54 PM BST
judorick   







  24 Sep 13 17:04 
Joined:


  27 Nov 11 
    | Topic/replies: 17,771  | Blogger: judorick's blog   



"All that glisters is not gold"

so many people say 'glitters' Angry




Idiot- both are correct

Yes - 'glisters' is the oldest quote from Merchant of Venice

but 'glitters' has been used for centuries and is also fine

- so calm down dear Cool
Report Coachbuster September 25, 2013 10:56 PM BST
and my all time  favourite Grin


... the Belgium lad could win this race >
Report lmfao September 25, 2013 10:56 PM BST
'of' in stead of 'have'

I could of gone out today

URGHHHSad
Report lmfao September 25, 2013 10:56 PM BST
I turned round and said to him


when there was no turning round at all
Report Coachbuster September 25, 2013 10:58 PM BST
I can never understand why folk use 'could of' when it's easier to say 'could ave' 
I generally  say 'coulda' which i think is the most commonly used one since it sounds less clumsy than 'could have'
Report Coachbuster September 25, 2013 10:59 PM BST
I coulda gone there today

I could have gone there today (sounds too long winded imo)
Report Coachbuster September 25, 2013 11:00 PM BST
another one ,

I don't have anything to say

I have nothing to say

2nd is easier
Report screaming from beneaththewaves September 25, 2013 11:35 PM BST
Well-paid BBC presenters/pundits/newsreaders who think AC Milan have a Brazilian midfielder called Cacker
Report MisterBadger September 26, 2013 12:15 AM BST
Plain sailing.

Plane sailing is the simplest form of navigation applicable to distances of < 600 nm.  The curvature of the Earth can be ignored, and the Earth's surface can be considered to be a plane.



Nice one, never heard that before  Happy
Report naydam September 26, 2013 12:28 AM BST
Hmmnm. Might not be as easy as that. Could be that plane sailing does, indeed, indicate navigation regarding the earth's surface as a flat plane, But 'plain sailing' seems to refer to sailing in waters that are clear and free from obstruction.

Just got that from Google' so It is not something of which I have personal knowledge, but there may be room for both.
Report naydam September 26, 2013 12:29 AM BST
Sorry, I have NO personal knowledge! Typo.
Report naydam September 26, 2013 12:31 AM BST
Oops! Already used 'not' so cancel above post! BlushBlushBlush
Report geos1 September 26, 2013 12:39 AM BST
that Victoria Coren has fantastic bosoms,no she only has one fantastic bosom
Report naydam September 26, 2013 12:42 AM BST
That's what is called 'changing tack'! Grin
Report Navel-Gazer September 26, 2013 12:52 AM BST
When morons say something has increased by 200%, it hasn't doubled, it's trebled!
If it's increased by 100% it's doubled Cry

Why sound so pretentious by using percentages that they know fcuk all about?
Report Joel September 26, 2013 4:36 AM BST
Lacksadaisical
Report Paddy Hair September 26, 2013 4:38 AM BST
Cacker is a midfield player not a defender. Kaka.
Report logroller September 26, 2013 6:59 AM BST
give 110%
Report naydam September 26, 2013 8:06 AM BST
That's nowt! I've seen a MILLION per cent bandied about on the Jeremy Kyle show. Now that IS a lot! Shocked
Report erse2 September 26, 2013 8:12 AM BST
i'll give 110% of what jeremy's saying.
Report Donnie Brasco September 26, 2013 8:53 PM BST
Police often guilty of this one,
responding to a reported burgalry
Report Velasquez September 26, 2013 9:01 PM BST
England playing the Belgiums...ffs...
Report Velasquez September 26, 2013 9:02 PM BST
On tenderhooks...
Report Navel-Gazer September 26, 2013 9:14 PM BST
DB - I can't stand it when Americans say 'burglarised' Cry
Report Navel-Gazer September 26, 2013 9:15 PM BST
And from the classic anals (sic) of George Bush...misunderestimated Angry
Report STUDYFORM September 26, 2013 9:32 PM BST
Nucular.
Report Emden September 26, 2013 9:46 PM BST
labratory instead of laboratory
Report Noble Patriarch September 27, 2013 9:59 AM BST
My boss spells 'per se' as 'per say'.  He also told me the other day 'I'm a glass half empty person...I'm really positive'.
Report cooperman September 27, 2013 2:07 PM BST
Advertised in my local paper...For Sale..... Chester draws!!Cry
Report rogerthebutler September 27, 2013 2:14 PM BST
Dunno if this has been done:

"You've got two choices"

No I haven't. I've got one choice between two options.

Also, 'compared to' should be 'compared with'.
Report starfish and coffee September 27, 2013 2:26 PM BST
I remember a radio report starting 'The average Bulgarian woman has had up to 7 abortions' which is nonsense, but heard many similar examples since.

It's like saying 'the average English man has scored up to 3 goals in a World Cup Final.'
Report Yojimbo September 27, 2013 3:00 PM BST
S + C - agree about that, very similar to sales advertising 'up to 50% off' - which tells you that there is no greater reduction than 50 % but nothing more.

'Tescos' instead of 'Tesco' winds anonoys me greatly for no apparent reason, mainly probably because it is so widespread - 'I'm just going to Tescos to get some....'
Report kincsem September 27, 2013 4:15 PM BST
Not saying people get wrong, just an annoying habit.

Also, in the other corner of the restaurant, I looked and I just saw, you know, like, dead bodies and stuff. And I was, like, really just praying for them to just wiggle a bit to see if they were, like, OK and alive.  Someone else also kind of moved to see his head - moved his head to see who was there. And I kind of, like, pointed to him, just like, are you OK? You know with my thumbs up. And he's, like, I'm OK.
Report sheppy123 September 27, 2013 4:17 PM BST
I often say... "I'm gonna make some bread" when really it should be... "I'm gonna butter some bread."

And even that's wrong cos it's usually margarine, not butter!

God I'm full of crap today!Laugh
Report Donnie Brasco September 27, 2013 5:51 PM BST
^ On a similar note, "the car wants cleaning". No, it may need cleaning but it doesn't really care either way.
Report Injera September 27, 2013 5:55 PM BST
Got a pal who I describe as verbally dyslexic..

Some of his gems:

When shove comes to push.

Ant in the ointment.

Catch 2 situation

A mate works in ITT

The HNS (NHS)

etc..
Report johnizere September 27, 2013 6:08 PM BST
only 3 more sleeps to (whatever)... Angry
Report Pandorica September 27, 2013 7:12 PM BST
I do "get-ups" Grin
Report Roquebrune September 27, 2013 7:54 PM BST
Nucular weapon.
Report naydam September 28, 2013 12:17 PM BST
A guy that I know said "Don't worry, I'll get my own back. Every dog has his bone".
Report sheppy123 September 29, 2013 3:11 PM BST
Saying "UM" instead of "THEM".

"I can't say I blame UM"


Just heard somebody say it which made me think "Great, I've got something else to tell my Betfair mates!"

Laugh
Report JOCI Club September 29, 2013 4:27 PM BST
The proof is in the pudding.
Report erse2 September 29, 2013 4:40 PM BST
Dunno if this has been done:

"You've got two choices"

No I haven't. I've got one choice between two options.


Pretty sure I've been one to say two choices, but I'll be using this at the next opportunity.
Report geos1 September 29, 2013 5:03 PM BST
a leper can't change his spots
Report Donnie Brasco September 29, 2013 9:42 PM BST
One the Mrs uses a lot is 'I got it off line' like buying it 'off Ebay' as if 'line' is some sort of supplier.
Report Coachbuster September 29, 2013 9:48 PM BST
i won it in an auction !


no you didn't ,you paid for it !  Crazy
Report Donnie Brasco September 29, 2013 10:11 PM BST
^ A bit off topic but that reminded me of a sign for a fairground I pass on the way home,
Wristbands- FREE unlimited rides - £6.99Confused
Report the_pessimist September 29, 2013 10:26 PM BST
I often drop in "Can I get a..." when ordering beers as it really winds a mate of mine up.

(Thinly veiled "I have a mate" post...)
Report Jack Bauer '24' September 29, 2013 10:51 PM BST
Many people don't seem to know the difference between imply and infer and already mentioned, affect and effect.
Report Jack Bauer '24' September 29, 2013 10:56 PM BST
Its and It's is another where people don't know the difference.
Report Coachbuster September 29, 2013 10:59 PM BST
a pair of trousers ,a pair of shorts ?  why,what,where,how,who,when,which ?  Crazy

no,its a trouser imo -

excuse me - can i try on this trouser ?  - followed by a funny look Grin
Report Coachbuster September 29, 2013 11:00 PM BST
next time i pick up a jumper i'm gonna say -  can i try on this pair of jumpers Devil
Report Navel-Gazer September 29, 2013 11:04 PM BST
JB - to be fair, there really isn't that much between 'imply' & 'infer' - it's not as if they've got entirely different meanings like alteration & alterCation.

That's probably the territory where pedantry meets tolerance of stupidity Devil
Report screaming from beneaththewaves September 29, 2013 11:11 PM BST
You would be happy among German speakers, Coachbuster. They wear eine Hose and that's the end of it. And the French make do with but a single pantalon. Yet Spaniards are only satisfied with pantalones. The Dutch are able to fit themselves into a single broek, but the same word in English multiplies itself into breeches.
Report Jack Bauer '24' September 29, 2013 11:15 PM BST
They have completely different meanings.

http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2011/10/imply-or-infer/
Report screaming from beneaththewaves September 29, 2013 11:15 PM BST
Imply and infer are as similar as forwards and backwards.

If I imply something, you can only infer my meaning. You can't imply it as well.

And if I infer something from what you've said, then you must have implied it to me. You can't infer your own implication.
Report Coachbuster September 29, 2013 11:23 PM BST
sbtw-that's some knowledge you have there my friend Shocked
Report screaming from beneaththewaves September 29, 2013 11:23 PM BST
Oh! Here's one that's almost de rigueur in the world of estate agent gobtoss: "The property comprises of living room, kitchen, blah blah."

No. It consists of living room, burble, gobtoss. But it comprises living room, hair gel, Mini Cooper etc.
Report travelling man September 29, 2013 11:25 PM BST
Misuse of "had" as in "Mr Jones had his house burgled"

Reads as though he arranged the burglary Confused
Report Navel-Gazer September 29, 2013 11:47 PM BST
Coachbuster - I agree sir...SBTW has made me realise I'm as thick as shít Devil
Report Donnie Brasco October 1, 2013 9:32 PM BST
Hugh Taylor has put one up today,

Isnt one for the feint-hearted
Report geos1 October 1, 2013 9:58 PM BST
the ball fell for him on his favoured left foot,just how many left feet has he got then?
Report Emden October 1, 2013 10:04 PM BST
he has two left feet ? (as in shyte footballer, dancer etc)

now that would be interesting
Report geos1 October 1, 2013 10:07 PM BST
one of the best footballers ever used to wear two left boots due to a birth defect
Report naydam October 2, 2013 12:02 AM BST
He was born with 'em on? Shocked
Report geos1 October 2, 2013 12:58 AM BST
like his legs I,ve gone off on a tangent.sorry
Report speedypro October 3, 2013 8:18 PM BST
Sikth instead of sixth. Martin Brundle this is you.
Report Jamieboy October 4, 2013 6:13 PM BST
Rob Burrows Leeds RL player, its Burrow F FS
Report STUDYFORM October 4, 2013 6:38 PM BST
Commentators always seem to call Ronaldo, "Renaldo".
Report Aunty Post October 7, 2013 11:24 AM BST
Just reading reviews on carpet cleaning detergent.....

"I have used it in the living room in a normal box standard VAX Rapide".
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