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roadrunner46
05 Jan 19 12:30
Joined:
Date Joined: 25 Apr 11
| Topic/replies: 7,214 | Blogger: roadrunner46's blog
facebook have had lot of bad news stories in the last 12 monthsCoolLaugh

52 week high 218.62

52 week low 123 .02

they hit that low on the 24 th december 2018, would of been a good time to invest.

current price 137.95


im thinking 160 / 170 range within the next 6 months, reason being most people can pick shares that will go up over a longer
period of time, picking shares that increase in value much faster is more rewarding Laugh

my last pick was tesco's at around 1.70, you know after that accounting scandal, when they had a missing £400 million
from their accounts, they actually went down to around 1.50 in the end and bounced back to 2.40 within the next 6 months.

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By:
roadrunner46
When: 05 Jan 19 12:56
apple another company that have performed badly in 2018, they will be selling their new iphones for around
£5.000 in the futureLaugh just need the chinese to start buying the phones againWink

52 week high 233.47

52 week low 142.00

current price 148.26

this one could go to around 180/200 price range, once again looking at 6 month time frame.
By:
roadrunner46
When: 05 Jan 19 13:10
royal mail their share price has dropped significantly in 2018

52 week high 632.60

52 week low 266.20

current price 286.90

looking at around 340/350 price range, 6 month time frame again.
By:
roadrunner46
When: 05 Jan 19 13:40
slightly different angle on this investment, actually have performed really well since the start of 2018.

netflix

52 week high 432.21

52 week low 204.00

current price 297.57

the price was 233.80 on 24 th december 2018 Cry

price range 350/375 this could take a little longer to achieve that price,im thinking 9 months time frame.
By:
roadrunner46
When: 05 Jan 19 13:48
faccbook 137.95 buyCool target 160/170 6 months

apple 148.26 buyCool target 180/200 6 months

royal mail 286.90 buy target 340/350 6 months

netflix 297.57 buy target 350/375 9 monthsWink
By:
peckerdunne
When: 06 Jan 19 22:39
The giro won't go far on these.

Interesting bit of fun mind.
By:
roadrunner46
When: 06 Jan 19 23:31
your right its already run out and still got another 2 weeks to goCryif had the money would of made 37k just trading tesco sharesLaugh will be taking an interest in the stock markets this year. ive picked
lot of companies to invest in through the years, all of them have been monster hits, just never had the
money to invest, so i know my skill level is up with the best. just waiting for the flat season now to start,
ive put all the strategies in place already. obviously im not familiar with the upswings of the stocks,
as you can see the ones ive picked have had massive downturn in thier prices, im wondering is it like this
every yearCool
By:
mrcombustible
When: 07 Jan 19 21:41
The Sunday Times, January 6 2019, 12:01am


When Steve Jobs unveiled the iPhone on January 9, 2007, Mike Lazaridis was at home, working up a sweat on his treadmill. On the television, the co-founder and showman of Apple was waxing poetic about the elegant little rectangle with a touchscreen and full web browser. The founder of Research in Motion, whose flagship product, Blackberry, had half the nascent smartphone market, wondered: “How did they do that?” He spoke to Jim Balsillie, his co-chief executive, and he was not alarmed. “We’ll be fine,” he opined.

BlackBerry, of course, was not fine. It quickly faded into irrelevance, its market share withering from 50% to less than 1%. The Canadian company’s bosses had not realised the gravity of the moment, for it was Jobs who really rang in the smartphone era. Over the next 12 years, more than 3.7bn people would buy an iPhone, or a cheaper copycat, connecting the world like never before. It also set Apple on an unprecedented run of profits that last year led to it becoming the first public company worth more than $1 trillion. Profits grew 11-fold over the period.

Every streak, though, comes to an end — even for Apple. Chief executive Tim Cook shocked investors on Wednesday with a huge profit warning. Sales of iPhones, profits and turnover had all fallen dramatically short of 2018 projections, he said, while providing little assurance that the road ahead would be easier. Apple stock plunged 9% on the news, falling from $157.92 to $144.04 and capping a torrid three months during which it has lost 39% of its value since October’s high of $232. It closed on Friday at $148.26.


Investors fret that Apple’s sudden slowdown marks the crossing of the Rubicon into a new era of corporate lethargy, with Apple living off retreads of past inventions rather than coming up with new ones. Goldman Sachs went so far as to compare Apple with Nokia, another once-innovative brand that the Cupertino juggernaut swept aside.

Beyond Apple itself, the shock announcement fanned concerns about a wider economic slowdown. Indeed, the following day, America’s ISM manufacturing index revealed the biggest monthly slowdown in factory activity since the 2008 recession. The Dow Jones industrial average plunged 2.8% before recovering on positive job news at the end of the week. The FTSE also yo-yoed, shedding 41 points before ending Friday in positive territory at 6,837.


Apple’s fall cannot be explained away simply by a weakening economy in China — though Cook tried. “Over 100%” of worldwide sales declines, he said, were due to disappointing China sales. The problems run deeper. Nearly three in four adults on the planet have smartphones. Most of the rest will buy one, too — but they are in the developing world and unlikely to be able to afford an iPhone.

The upshot is that we have reached what Benedict Evans, a partner at venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, has called “the end of the beginning”. The era of an always-on, wired-in planet of consumers has arrived. By extension, the era of smartphone mega-growth appears to be over.

Indeed, sales of high-end smartphones peaked in 2015 and have gone down every year since. Last year was the first that smartphone sales, at all price points, fell, according to Bernstein Research.

Which harks back to BlackBerry’s flat-footed founders. Their company was obliterated by a new product that redefined what a phone could be. Today, despite design supremo Sir Jony Ive’s best efforts, the iPhone is not appreciably different from any number of rivals with huge touchscreens, professional-quality cameras and superfast connections.

Yet Cook still sells his smartphones as if they are. The average retail price for an iPhone is about $800 (£630)— almost five times the average for a non- Apple handset. Not surprisingly, people are holding on to them longer. The average upgrade cycle — when people trade in old phones for new models — has extended from two years to three, robbing Apple of a key profit driver.


Cook did not countenance the possibility last week that he may have gone too far with the £1,000 iPhone X, or other models that sell at a premium to rival models with similar capabilities. Bernstein’s Toni Sacconaghi understood his dilemma, writing: “Drop prices and margins will be pressured and could cannibalise higher-end offerings. Maintain prices, and customers could increasingly look to less expensive alternatives.”

Perhaps the most salient point revealed by last week’s announcement was that Apple has lost China, the world’s second-biggest economy and source of a fifth of the company’s sales. There are several reasons, but the biggest is WeChat. The app, created by Chinese giant Tencent, is central to life in the People’s Republic in a way that most westerners simply can’t comprehend. It is a social network that allows people to book travel, hail a cab, pay for lunch, make phone calls, transfer funds . . . the list goes on. And it works on the cheapest Android handsets just as well as it does on an iPhone X.

The key to the appeal of the iPhone as a luxury product is its iOS operating system, which houses messages, photos and contacts — and manages apps — that are shared across other Apple devices. This makes it painful for anyone to give up their iPhone for a rival. If you leave, you lose it all. That has created an incredibly powerful moat around the Apple fortress. WeChat, however, obviates the need for iOS, which makes it that much harder to justify paying for an iPhone.

A China-based businessman said: “Why would I pay $800 more for a piece of hardware where all I need it for is WeChat? It makes no sense. The iPhone is just one phone of many — and it’s by far the most expensive.” Indeed, while the iPhone has more than a third of the British market, in China its share has halved from 14% to 7% in the past three years.

Apple’s stumble also appears to have confirmed the worst fears of investors who have grown increasingly concerned that China, the engine of the global economy’s post-recession resurgence, is slowing down. Chinese car sales in November plunged 14% from the same month the year before — a fall that was “quite unprecedented”, said George Magnus, associate at Oxford University’s China Centre and author of the book Red Flags: Why Xi’s China is in Jeopardy.

He said that the fall, along with meagre income growth, contracting factory activity and a jump in the household debt-to-income ratio to 107% — near the level America hit before the recession — were all signs that “the slowdown in China is becoming ubiquitous”.

Donald Trump’s trade war has added to the problems. Cook admitted last week that the tension between Washington and Beijing “appeared to reach consumers as well, with traffic to our retail stores and our channel partners in China declining”.

The Chinese have a history of selectively shunning foreign products, either through state-sponsored campaigns or spontaneous boycotts. Beijing boycotted Norwegian salmon after dissident Liu Xiaobo was awarded the Nobel peace prize in Oslo in 2010. Japanese products were hit in 2013 in the wake of a territorial row over the Senkaku Islands. Magnus said: “The Chinese have form here.”

Referring to the recent arrest in Canada of the finance chief of the Chinese telecoms giant Huawei, at America’s behest, a China insider said: “If you arrest a Chinese chief financial officer, people view it here as all-out war. Apple has become a lightning rod for everything American at the moment.”

The good news is that Apple is neither BlackBerry nor Nokia. It has $130bn in cash, which is enough to buy, say, Netflix. It sells more Apple Watch models than all the timepieces turned out by Switzerland. Its services business, which encompasses everything from iCloud to the App Store and Apple Music, is on pace to bring in more than $40bn this year and is wildly profitable. Apple Music is an empire within the empire that, if it stood alone, would easily slot into the Fortune 100 rankings of the top US companies.

It is a key area for Cook. Short of a “next big thing” such as a big plunge into healthcare or a self-driving car (Apple is developing an electric car, but it is thought to be years away), the company must pull the levers it can to extract more cash from its iPhones and iPads. Apple has an installed base of 1.3bn devices around the world.

This is why Cook has signed the likes of Steven Spielberg, Jennifer Aniston and Oprah Winfrey to huge contracts for shows that it plans to offer in a beefed-up Apple Music subscription that will include streaming films. Cook’s next trick: turning every Apple device into a cash machine that, every month, sends cash — be it through subscriptions or a cut of in-app purchases — back to the “spaceship” campus in Silicon Valley.

It is not as sexy as a category-defining gadget but, for Apple, which is approaching 43 years old, figuring out creative new ways to make money off its past glories is vital. In his investor letter, Cook wrote: “Apple innovates like no other company on Earth, and we are not taking our foot off the gas.”

The problem is that since Cook took over in 2011, Apple’s innovation record has been lacking — and the era of mega-growth, which was unleashed by the smartphone revolution and has defined Cook’s reign, is over.



Apple iPhone XS Max, from £1,099
The handset has a huge, 6.5in display and takes great photos with a minimum of fuss. It also has a hard-to-swallow price tag, no headphone jack and no fingerprint sensor (use face recognition to unlock). Wireless charging is useful, but slower than relying on an old-fashioned cable.

Huawei Mate 20 Pro, £900
Not an Apple fan? Android is the only other smartphone system in town, and the Mate20 Pro shows it off in state-of-the-art hardware. That means a triple-lens camera, massive battery, fingerprint sensor built into the screen, and a “wraparound” display to make the iPhone look stale.

Motorola One, £280
Motorola has found the sweet spot between hi-tech and low price. Its new One largely lacks the extra, probably unwanted, apps that many makers load onto Android, and concentrates on what most users want: long battery life, big screen, turbo recharging and, at 64GB, generous storage.
By:
roadrunner46
When: 07 Jan 19 21:59

Jan 5, 2019 -- 12:56PM, roadrunner46 wrote:


apple another company that have performed badly in 2018, they will be selling their new iphones for around£5.000 in the future just need the chinese to start buying the phones again52 week high 233.4752 week low 142.00current price 148.26this one could go to around 180/200 price range, once again looking at 6 month time frame.


i thought i covered all this with this post, apparently apple are worth 999 billion, makes some good points,
make my own mind up, these high volume gamblers who work in that industry, they get it wrong all the timeWink

By:
roadrunner46
When: 07 Jan 19 22:04
the sunday times whos share tips for 2018 finished 27% down lastLaugh picking companies very few people
on the planet would of heard of. thats not my bagWink
By:
roadrunner46
When: 09 Jan 19 09:43
the percieved wisdom when investing in stockmarkets is always to spread the risk around a few companies and different sectorsLaugh
this line is always trotted out by industry experts ect ect, my preferred style of investing is to go ALL IN on just one company,
how that company is chosen, is not by doing research and listening to industry expertsWink  perspicacity is at playGrin
By:
roadrunner46
When: 12 Jan 19 15:36
google finance WATCHLIST

alphabet 1063 current price (1291) (977)

spotify 121 current price (199) (103) they have never made a profitCrazyas the analyst's say, they havent
been able to workout how they can make a profit yet Laugh

tesco 218 (266) (187) this share looking at the graphs has so much ups and downs, anything under 200 and
that would be a BUY.  target 220/230 6 months

paypal 90 (93) (70) target 110/120 6 months, this companies growth potential looks good



warren buffett apparently one of his favourite companies is APPLE and he holds 74 million sharesGrin
By:
roadrunner46
When: 15 Jan 19 15:57
it took 10 days to achieve, what i thought might take 9 monthsLaugh, the analysts are predicting 400/450 range on the netflix shares, all in on one company always my preferred strategyCool


NETFLIX 297.57 BUY NETFLIX 352.00 SELLWink
By:
roadrunner46
When: 15 Jan 19 19:43
two more for the watchlist

snap current price 6.50 (21.22) (4.82) they have a few class action court cases coming upShocked

twitter current price 32.96 (47.79) (22.04)
By:
roadrunner46
When: 16 Jan 19 17:52
snap current price 5.77 BUY (21.22)  (4.82) target price 7.00/7.50 and hope the court cases go well later this month, the founder refused to sell the company for 30 billion to google, which was a big mistake.
more of a speculative pickWink
By:
roadrunner46
When: 17 Jan 19 21:03
one more for the watchlist

fintech 17.38 euros (36.00) (15.04) snoop dog's investment fund are buying the stockShocked
By:
roadrunner46
When: 23 Jan 19 01:46
"be fearful when others are greedy and be greedy when others are fearful" warren buffett

netflix 297.57 buy

netflix 352.00 sell

netflix current price 325.16Laugh

apparently individual investors are good at picking stocks, the institutions always beat them when it comes
to selling stocks in the long run. dont know if that is because they sell the stock to early or too late.
By:
roadrunner46
When: 29 Jan 19 18:00
been watching the markets closely everyday, noticed royal mail had stabilized around the 300 for the last week or so, seen it climbing, was thinking to myself whats happening? hadn't heard any news, what do you know
they were about to release their last 9 months trading statementWhoops if i would of known that would of
sold at 300 mark. good lesson learned thereCool going to have to hold and hope they recover and then
dump the stock.

SNAP 5.77 buy

SNAP 6.40 sell

they got their trading statement coming out soon, not expecting good news from them either.

next trade going to be PAYPAL

PAYPAL 90.94 buyWink looking for 100 dollars a share target 6 months
By:
roadrunner46
When: 29 Jan 19 18:04
SNAP was a good trade, got back most of its value, after it dropped suddenly when the finance director
decided to resignLaugh


netflix trade took 10 days

snap trade took 13 days
By:
roadrunner46
When: 29 Jan 19 22:57

Jan 7, 2019 -- 9:41PM, mrcombustible wrote:


The Sunday Times, January 6 2019, 12:01amWhen Steve Jobs unveiled the iPhone on January 9, 2007, Mike Lazaridis was at home, working up a sweat on his treadmill. On the television, the co-founder and showman of Apple was waxing poetic about the elegant little rectangle with a touchscreen and full web browser. The founder of Research in Motion, whose flagship product, Blackberry, had half the nascent smartphone market, wondered: “How did they do that?” He spoke to Jim Balsillie, his co-chief executive, and he was not alarmed. “We’ll be fine,” he opined.BlackBerry, of course, was not fine. It quickly faded into irrelevance, its market share withering from 50% to less than 1%. The Canadian company’s bosses had not realised the gravity of the moment, for it was Jobs who really rang in the smartphone era. Over the next 12 years, more than 3.7bn people would buy an iPhone, or a cheaper copycat, connecting the world like never before. It also set Apple on an unprecedented run of profits that last year led to it becoming the first public company worth more than $1 trillion. Profits grew 11-fold over the period.Every streak, though, comes to an end — even for Apple. Chief executive Tim Cook shocked investors on Wednesday with a huge profit warning. Sales of iPhones, profits and turnover had all fallen dramatically short of 2018 projections, he said, while providing little assurance that the road ahead would be easier. Apple stock plunged 9% on the news, falling from $157.92 to $144.04 and capping a torrid three months during which it has lost 39% of its value since October’s high of $232. It closed on Friday at $148.26. Investors fret that Apple’s sudden slowdown marks the crossing of the Rubicon into a new era of corporate lethargy, with Apple living off retreads of past inventions rather than coming up with new ones. Goldman Sachs went so far as to compare Apple with Nokia, another once-innovative brand that the Cupertino juggernaut swept aside.Beyond Apple itself, the shock announcement fanned concerns about a wider economic slowdown. Indeed, the following day, America’s ISM manufacturing index revealed the biggest monthly slowdown in factory activity since the 2008 recession. The Dow Jones industrial average plunged 2.8% before recovering on positive job news at the end of the week. The FTSE also yo-yoed, shedding 41 points before ending Friday in positive territory at 6,837.Apple’s fall cannot be explained away simply by a weakening economy in China — though Cook tried. “Over 100%” of worldwide sales declines, he said, were due to disappointing China sales. The problems run deeper. Nearly three in four adults on the planet have smartphones. Most of the rest will buy one, too — but they are in the developing world and unlikely to be able to afford an iPhone.The upshot is that we have reached what Benedict Evans, a partner at venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, has called “the end of the beginning”. The era of an always-on, wired-in planet of consumers has arrived. By extension, the era of smartphone mega-growth appears to be over.Indeed, sales of high-end smartphones peaked in 2015 and have gone down every year since. Last year was the first that smartphone sales, at all price points, fell, according to Bernstein Research.Which harks back to BlackBerry’s flat-footed founders. Their company was obliterated by a new product that redefined what a phone could be. Today, despite design supremo Sir Jony Ive’s best efforts, the iPhone is not appreciably different from any number of rivals with huge touchscreens, professional-quality cameras and superfast connections.Yet Cook still sells his smartphones as if they are. The average retail price for an iPhone is about $800 (£630)— almost five times the average for a non- Apple handset. Not surprisingly, people are holding on to them longer. The average upgrade cycle — when people trade in old phones for new models — has extended from two years to three, robbing Apple of a key profit driver. Cook did not countenance the possibility last week that he may have gone too far with the £1,000 iPhone X, or other models that sell at a premium to rival models with similar capabilities. Bernstein’s Toni Sacconaghi understood his dilemma, writing: “Drop prices and margins will be pressured and could cannibalise higher-end offerings. Maintain prices, and customers could increasingly look to less expensive alternatives.”Perhaps the most salient point revealed by last week’s announcement was that Apple has lost China, the world’s second-biggest economy and source of a fifth of the company’s sales. There are several reasons, but the biggest is WeChat. The app, created by Chinese giant Tencent, is central to life in the People’s Republic in a way that most westerners simply can’t comprehend. It is a social network that allows people to book travel, hail a cab, pay for lunch, make phone calls, transfer funds . . . the list goes on. And it works on the cheapest Android handsets just as well as it does on an iPhone X.The key to the appeal of the iPhone as a luxury product is its iOS operating system, which houses messages, photos and contacts — and manages apps — that are shared across other Apple devices. This makes it painful for anyone to give up their iPhone for a rival. If you leave, you lose it all. That has created an incredibly powerful moat around the Apple fortress. WeChat, however, obviates the need for iOS, which makes it that much harder to justify paying for an iPhone.A China-based businessman said: “Why would I pay $800 more for a piece of hardware where all I need it for is WeChat? It makes no sense. The iPhone is just one phone of many — and it’s by far the most expensive.” Indeed, while the iPhone has more than a third of the British market, in China its share has halved from 14% to 7% in the past three years.Apple’s stumble also appears to have confirmed the worst fears of investors who have grown increasingly concerned that China, the engine of the global economy’s post-recession resurgence, is slowing down. Chinese car sales in November plunged 14% from the same month the year before — a fall that was “quite unprecedented”, said George Magnus, associate at Oxford University’s China Centre and author of the book Red Flags: Why Xi’s China is in Jeopardy.He said that the fall, along with meagre income growth, contracting factory activity and a jump in the household debt-to-income ratio to 107% — near the level America hit before the recession — were all signs that “the slowdown in China is becoming ubiquitous”.Donald Trump’s trade war has added to the problems. Cook admitted last week that the tension between Washington and Beijing “appeared to reach consumers as well, with traffic to our retail stores and our channel partners in China declining”.The Chinese have a history of selectively shunning foreign products, either through state-sponsored campaigns or spontaneous boycotts. Beijing boycotted Norwegian salmon after dissident Liu Xiaobo was awarded the Nobel peace prize in Oslo in 2010. Japanese products were hit in 2013 in the wake of a territorial row over the Senkaku Islands. Magnus said: “The Chinese have form here.”Referring to the recent arrest in Canada of the finance chief of the Chinese telecoms giant Huawei, at America’s behest, a China insider said: “If you arrest a Chinese chief financial officer, people view it here as all-out war. Apple has become a lightning rod for everything American at the moment.”The good news is that Apple is neither BlackBerry nor Nokia. It has $130bn in cash, which is enough to buy, say, Netflix. It sells more Apple Watch models than all the timepieces turned out by Switzerland. Its services business, which encompasses everything from iCloud to the App Store and Apple Music, is on pace to bring in more than $40bn this year and is wildly profitable. Apple Music is an empire within the empire that, if it stood alone, would easily slot into the Fortune 100 rankings of the top US companies.It is a key area for Cook. Short of a “next big thing” such as a big plunge into healthcare or a self-driving car (Apple is developing an electric car, but it is thought to be years away), the company must pull the levers it can to extract more cash from its iPhones and iPads. Apple has an installed base of 1.3bn devices around the world.This is why Cook has signed the likes of Steven Spielberg, Jennifer Aniston and Oprah Winfrey to huge contracts for shows that it plans to offer in a beefed-up Apple Music subscription that will include streaming films. Cook’s next trick: turning every Apple device into a cash machine that, every month, sends cash — be it through subscriptions or a cut of in-app purchases — back to the “spaceship” campus in Silicon Valley.It is not as sexy as a category-defining gadget but, for Apple, which is approaching 43 years old, figuring out creative new ways to make money off its past glories is vital. In his investor letter, Cook wrote: “Apple innovates like no other company on Earth, and we are not taking our foot off the gas.”The problem is that since Cook took over in 2011, Apple’s innovation record has been lacking — and the era of mega-growth, which was unleashed by the smartphone revolution and has defined Cook’s reign, is over.Apple iPhone XS Max, from £1,099The handset has a huge, 6.5in display and takes great photos with a minimum of fuss. It also has a hard-to-swallow price tag, no headphone jack and no fingerprint sensor (use face recognition to unlock). Wireless charging is useful, but slower than relying on an old-fashioned cable.Huawei Mate 20 Pro, £900Not an Apple fan? Android is the only other smartphone system in town, and the Mate20 Pro shows it off in state-of-the-art hardware. That means a triple-lens camera, massive battery, fingerprint sensor built into the screen, and a “wraparound” display to make the iPhone look stale.Motorola One, £280Motorola has found the sweet spot between hi-tech and low price. Its new One largely lacks the extra, probably unwanted, apps that many makers load onto Android, and concentrates on what most users want: long battery life, big screen, turbo recharging and, at 64GB, generous storage.


apple have doe reasonably well, despite the pessimism, first Q 1 results for 2019, hope its 170 by tomoro morningLaugh

By:
roadrunner46
When: 30 Jan 19 15:41
APPLE  148.26 buy

APPLE  162.00 sell

APPLE  trade took 25 days
By:
roadrunner46
When: 30 Jan 19 22:09
facebook just smashed through the target of 160 dollars in after hours trading, Q 4 results are greatLaugh
By:
roadrunner46
When: 31 Jan 19 02:47
traders term facebooks shares POPPED to 167 after the Q 4 results, going to sell tomoroWink

another thing ive learnt over the last month is how these big companies are evolving their financial
results reports, in other words they are being very clever in what they will be disclosing in future
reportsLaugh interesting the moves how they evolve through the calendar year, punctuated by the
earnings results.
By:
roadrunner46
When: 31 Jan 19 15:32
FACEBOOK  167.00 sell
By:
roadrunner46
When: 31 Jan 19 15:46
NETFLIX 297.57 entry = 352.00 exit (5th jan to 15th jan)

SNAP 5.77 entry = 6.40 exit (16th jan to 29th jan)

APPLE 148.26 entry = 162.00 exit (5th jan to 30th jan)

FACEBOOK 137.95 entry = 167.00 exit ( 5th jan to 31st jan)

ROYAL MAIL 286.90 entry HOLD  current price 270 ( sell order at 280.00)

PAYPAL 90.94 entry HOLD current 87.92 ( sell order at 100.00)

WATCHLIST

ALPHABET 1063.00 current price 1109.00

SPOTIFY 121.00 current price 138.00

TWITTER 32.96 current price 33.04

FINTECH 17.38 current price 18.96

TESCO 218.00 current price 222.70 ( buy order at 200.00)

most of the work has been done now.
By:
roadrunner46
When: 01 Feb 19 14:40
these are some of my thoughts on what these companies might be worth over the long haulLaugh

AMAZON.COM.INC current market cap 840 billion (2 trillion)

APPLE INC. current market cap 784 billion (1.5 trillion)

ALPHABET INC (GOOGLE) CLASS A 783 billion (1.5 trillion)

FACEBOOK.INC. 478 billion (1 trillion)
By:
peckerdunne
When: 01 Feb 19 23:09
Be nice to people on the up....Grin
By:
roadrunner46
When: 02 Feb 19 07:58

Feb 1, 2019 -- 11:09PM, peckerdunne wrote:


Be nice to people on the up....


cryptic having a meaning that is mysterious or obscure, sums up your post on a nutshell

By:
roadrunner46
When: 02 Feb 19 21:05
will have to find something lot more challenging than horse racing and stocks and shares in the futureLaughWink
By:
roadrunner46
When: 02 Feb 19 22:07
a good excerpt from phill bull's autobiography

The truth is that backers are not betting against the bookmakers, or against the tote. They're betting
against one another, with the bookies and the tote as middlemen, taking a rake-off for their services.
The rake-off is so so big that only a few can win. The question is how to be one of the few.
By:
peckerdunne
When: 04 Feb 19 13:51
Should have read, be nice to people on the way up...
By:
roadrunner46
When: 05 Feb 19 22:45
SNAP's earning reports must of been good they just hit $8.18 they have exceeded my target of $7.50Laugh


thats 43% in just 20 days Wink
By:
roadrunner46
When: 06 Feb 19 11:12

Jan 7, 2019 -- 9:41PM, mrcombustible wrote:


The Sunday Times, January 6 2019, 12:01amWhen Steve Jobs unveiled the iPhone on January 9, 2007, Mike Lazaridis was at home, working up a sweat on his treadmill. On the television, the co-founder and showman of Apple was waxing poetic about the elegant little rectangle with a touchscreen and full web browser. The founder of Research in Motion, whose flagship product, Blackberry, had half the nascent smartphone market, wondered: “How did they do that?” He spoke to Jim Balsillie, his co-chief executive, and he was not alarmed. “We’ll be fine,” he opined.BlackBerry, of course, was not fine. It quickly faded into irrelevance, its market share withering from 50% to less than 1%. The Canadian company’s bosses had not realised the gravity of the moment, for it was Jobs who really rang in the smartphone era. Over the next 12 years, more than 3.7bn people would buy an iPhone, or a cheaper copycat, connecting the world like never before. It also set Apple on an unprecedented run of profits that last year led to it becoming the first public company worth more than $1 trillion. Profits grew 11-fold over the period.Every streak, though, comes to an end — even for Apple. Chief executive Tim Cook shocked investors on Wednesday with a huge profit warning. Sales of iPhones, profits and turnover had all fallen dramatically short of 2018 projections, he said, while providing little assurance that the road ahead would be easier. Apple stock plunged 9% on the news, falling from $157.92 to $144.04 and capping a torrid three months during which it has lost 39% of its value since October’s high of $232. It closed on Friday at $148.26. Investors fret that Apple’s sudden slowdown marks the crossing of the Rubicon into a new era of corporate lethargy, with Apple living off retreads of past inventions rather than coming up with new ones. Goldman Sachs went so far as to compare Apple with Nokia, another once-innovative brand that the Cupertino juggernaut swept aside.Beyond Apple itself, the shock announcement fanned concerns about a wider economic slowdown. Indeed, the following day, America’s ISM manufacturing index revealed the biggest monthly slowdown in factory activity since the 2008 recession. The Dow Jones industrial average plunged 2.8% before recovering on positive job news at the end of the week. The FTSE also yo-yoed, shedding 41 points before ending Friday in positive territory at 6,837.Apple’s fall cannot be explained away simply by a weakening economy in China — though Cook tried. “Over 100%” of worldwide sales declines, he said, were due to disappointing China sales. The problems run deeper. Nearly three in four adults on the planet have smartphones. Most of the rest will buy one, too — but they are in the developing world and unlikely to be able to afford an iPhone.The upshot is that we have reached what Benedict Evans, a partner at venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, has called “the end of the beginning”. The era of an always-on, wired-in planet of consumers has arrived. By extension, the era of smartphone mega-growth appears to be over.Indeed, sales of high-end smartphones peaked in 2015 and have gone down every year since. Last year was the first that smartphone sales, at all price points, fell, according to Bernstein Research.Which harks back to BlackBerry’s flat-footed founders. Their company was obliterated by a new product that redefined what a phone could be. Today, despite design supremo Sir Jony Ive’s best efforts, the iPhone is not appreciably different from any number of rivals with huge touchscreens, professional-quality cameras and superfast connections.Yet Cook still sells his smartphones as if they are. The average retail price for an iPhone is about $800 (£630)— almost five times the average for a non- Apple handset. Not surprisingly, people are holding on to them longer. The average upgrade cycle — when people trade in old phones for new models — has extended from two years to three, robbing Apple of a key profit driver. Cook did not countenance the possibility last week that he may have gone too far with the £1,000 iPhone X, or other models that sell at a premium to rival models with similar capabilities. Bernstein’s Toni Sacconaghi understood his dilemma, writing: “Drop prices and margins will be pressured and could cannibalise higher-end offerings. Maintain prices, and customers could increasingly look to less expensive alternatives.”Perhaps the most salient point revealed by last week’s announcement was that Apple has lost China, the world’s second-biggest economy and source of a fifth of the company’s sales. There are several reasons, but the biggest is WeChat. The app, created by Chinese giant Tencent, is central to life in the People’s Republic in a way that most westerners simply can’t comprehend. It is a social network that allows people to book travel, hail a cab, pay for lunch, make phone calls, transfer funds . . . the list goes on. And it works on the cheapest Android handsets just as well as it does on an iPhone X.The key to the appeal of the iPhone as a luxury product is its iOS operating system, which houses messages, photos and contacts — and manages apps — that are shared across other Apple devices. This makes it painful for anyone to give up their iPhone for a rival. If you leave, you lose it all. That has created an incredibly powerful moat around the Apple fortress. WeChat, however, obviates the need for iOS, which makes it that much harder to justify paying for an iPhone.A China-based businessman said: “Why would I pay $800 more for a piece of hardware where all I need it for is WeChat? It makes no sense. The iPhone is just one phone of many — and it’s by far the most expensive.” Indeed, while the iPhone has more than a third of the British market, in China its share has halved from 14% to 7% in the past three years.Apple’s stumble also appears to have confirmed the worst fears of investors who have grown increasingly concerned that China, the engine of the global economy’s post-recession resurgence, is slowing down. Chinese car sales in November plunged 14% from the same month the year before — a fall that was “quite unprecedented”, said George Magnus, associate at Oxford University’s China Centre and author of the book Red Flags: Why Xi’s China is in Jeopardy.He said that the fall, along with meagre income growth, contracting factory activity and a jump in the household debt-to-income ratio to 107% — near the level America hit before the recession — were all signs that “the slowdown in China is becoming ubiquitous”.Donald Trump’s trade war has added to the problems. Cook admitted last week that the tension between Washington and Beijing “appeared to reach consumers as well, with traffic to our retail stores and our channel partners in China declining”.The Chinese have a history of selectively shunning foreign products, either through state-sponsored campaigns or spontaneous boycotts. Beijing boycotted Norwegian salmon after dissident Liu Xiaobo was awarded the Nobel peace prize in Oslo in 2010. Japanese products were hit in 2013 in the wake of a territorial row over the Senkaku Islands. Magnus said: “The Chinese have form here.”Referring to the recent arrest in Canada of the finance chief of the Chinese telecoms giant Huawei, at America’s behest, a China insider said: “If you arrest a Chinese chief financial officer, people view it here as all-out war. Apple has become a lightning rod for everything American at the moment.”The good news is that Apple is neither BlackBerry nor Nokia. It has $130bn in cash, which is enough to buy, say, Netflix. It sells more Apple Watch models than all the timepieces turned out by Switzerland. Its services business, which encompasses everything from iCloud to the App Store and Apple Music, is on pace to bring in more than $40bn this year and is wildly profitable. Apple Music is an empire within the empire that, if it stood alone, would easily slot into the Fortune 100 rankings of the top US companies.It is a key area for Cook. Short of a “next big thing” such as a big plunge into healthcare or a self-driving car (Apple is developing an electric car, but it is thought to be years away), the company must pull the levers it can to extract more cash from its iPhones and iPads. Apple has an installed base of 1.3bn devices around the world.This is why Cook has signed the likes of Steven Spielberg, Jennifer Aniston and Oprah Winfrey to huge contracts for shows that it plans to offer in a beefed-up Apple Music subscription that will include streaming films. Cook’s next trick: turning every Apple device into a cash machine that, every month, sends cash — be it through subscriptions or a cut of in-app purchases — back to the “spaceship” campus in Silicon Valley.It is not as sexy as a category-defining gadget but, for Apple, which is approaching 43 years old, figuring out creative new ways to make money off its past glories is vital. In his investor letter, Cook wrote: “Apple innovates like no other company on Earth, and we are not taking our foot off the gas.”The problem is that since Cook took over in 2011, Apple’s innovation record has been lacking — and the era of mega-growth, which was unleashed by the smartphone revolution and has defined Cook’s reign, is over.Apple iPhone XS Max, from £1,099The handset has a huge, 6.5in display and takes great photos with a minimum of fuss. It also has a hard-to-swallow price tag, no headphone jack and no fingerprint sensor (use face recognition to unlock). Wireless charging is useful, but slower than relying on an old-fashioned cable.Huawei Mate 20 Pro, £900Not an Apple fan? Android is the only other smartphone system in town, and the Mate20 Pro shows it off in state-of-the-art hardware. That means a triple-lens camera, massive battery, fingerprint sensor built into the screen, and a “wraparound” display to make the iPhone look stale.Motorola One, £280Motorola has found the sweet spot between hi-tech and low price. Its new One largely lacks the extra, probably unwanted, apps that many makers load onto Android, and concentrates on what most users want: long battery life, big screen, turbo recharging and, at 64GB, generous storage.


ive been proven right time and time again, currently trading $27 dollars more than when you posted this story, i do hope you didnt put anyone off investing Wink

By:
roadrunner46
When: 28 Feb 19 21:59
one month has passed since i put up PAYPAL  at 90.84 they are now at around 98 dollars, dont know whats
taking so long to reach the 100$ markLaugh can you believe it SNAP smashing through the 10$ mark this
month, there really was a hidden gem amongst those share tips Cool
By:
Catch Me ifyoucan
When: 01 Mar 19 18:51
Market up 30% since 24th Dec - some individual companies up alot more - 'Best start to the year' only occurred a few other times - rare and worrisome, so watch out for the 'vix'

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/03/01/stocks-just-did-something-they-havent-done-in-more-than-two-decades.html

CM iyc Devil
By:
roadrunner46
When: 07 Mar 19 15:24
who predicted this, the legend RR46 the best figures on the internetCool
By:
roadrunner46
When: 15 Mar 19 21:10
PAYPAL have smashed the 100 dollars markWink pmsl APPLE heading towards 200 dollarsLaugh
and SNAP have nearly doubled in price 11.10 dollars, snoop dogg is laughing FIN TECH GROUP at 21.80  up almost 25%


will update at the end of the year to see what where highest prices the shares achieved in 2019.
By:
roadrunner46
When: 09 Apr 19 00:45
so it took apple 3 months to hit the magic $200 dollars a share in double quick timeWink
im wondering can they improve on last years $233.47, as i have valued the company at 1.5 trillion, current market cap 934 billion.$250 a share this year would be amazing. must be all those different revenue streams
bringing in the cash for appleLaugh
By:
roadrunner46
When: 09 Apr 19 00:48
if PAYPAL can hit the $110/120 target this year,that will be superbHappy. $106.57 at the moment.
By:
roadrunner46
When: 12 Jul 19 06:38
checked the share prices yesterday, they have all sky rocketed past my expectationsWink
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