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Anaglogs Daughter
28 Jul 12 10:46
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Date Joined: 05 Jan 10
| Topic/replies: 1,419 | Blogger: Anaglogs Daughter's blog
By Vincent Hogan in London
Saturday July 28 2012 irishindependent.ie

THE Irish Olympic squad was rocked last night by claims of a betting scandal involving a member of the team.

Olympic Council of Ireland President Pat Hickey confirmed to the Irish Independent that they had received an allegation concerning one of the competitors due to compete at the London Games.

He said the council sought legal advice on the matter and were told that they had a duty "under the rules of natural justice" to inform the competitor of the allegation being made.

The OCI subsequently received a detailed letter from the competitor's solicitor on Thursday and a full investigation is now under way.

The allegation is that on a previous occasion the competitor made two bets backing an opponent to win an event in which they themselves were directly competing.

The International Olympic Committee's (IOC) code of conduct specifically outlaws this practice.

Indeed, earlier this month IOC chief Jacques Rogge said “the fight against doping and illegal gambling remain the absolute priority of the IOC”.

While the OCI is – as yet – merely in receipt of an anonymous email making the allegation, the Irish Independent has taken possession of detailed documentary evidence suggesting the competitor used their personal account with a large bookmaking firm to place two separate bets, both backing a specific opponent to claim victory in a competition they themselves were entered in.

The bets, at a price of 12/1, were placed the day before their competition started. Both were successful and the competitor withdrew €3,600 in cash on returning from the event.

Hickey said that if found guilty, any competitor would face “severe sanctions” that could include exclusion from the Olympics. That is unlikely to happen in this particular case as the time-frame is too tight for a proper investigation to be completed.

“This is fraught with legal issues,” explained Hickey last night, “and, right now, our priority is not to cause any unnecessary upset to the competitors.” In the documents held by the Irish Independent, the competitor is seen to have made a credit card deposit of €300 into their personal betting account.

Three minutes later, they place a bet of €41 at 12/1, backing an opponent to win gold. Roughly 20 minutes later, they then place a second bet of €259 backing the same opponent at the same price.
The following day, they went into competition against that opponent. Records show that the first bet brought a winning return of €533 and the second one €3,367. The competitor's home address and mobile number are among the details included in the documentation in our possession.

It's news that the Irish team could have done without just as the Games begin. It has been a fraught Olympic build-up for the Irish with a legal row over the make-up of the women’s 400 metre relay team as well two Irish athletes taking cases for non-selection to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.


Boxer Joe Ward's appeal was rejected on Thursday and the fate of show-jumper Denis Lynch will be known today.
Pause Switch to Standard View Betting scandal claims rock Irish...
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Report RemoteWine July 28, 2012 11:09 AM BST
I find it a bit odd. Not many of our athletes compete in sports that would be priced up by the bookies let alone accept a 300 quid bet at 12/1.
It says in the article and they used the same phrase on the news i heard on the radio "both bets were sucessful", it was the same bet but saying like that sounds more sinister like it was more than a once off.
Report Ozymandius July 28, 2012 11:11 AM BST
Confused
Report Anaglogs Daughter July 28, 2012 11:12 AM BST
Well i haven't a clue who it is but we all know which is the most corrupt sport because of it's judging system.
Report Anaglogs Daughter July 28, 2012 11:16 AM BST
No one knows the scores until after it's over, it's a bit like having a bet on Frankel and it winning 10 lengths then the judge calling the result 1st Excalabration.
Report RemoteWine July 28, 2012 11:23 AM BST
what sport , boxing ? Don't you see the scores as it happens in amateur boxing ?
Report db1974 July 28, 2012 11:28 AM BST
Don't see why it has to be a corrupt sport that the bet was placed on
Report RemoteWine July 28, 2012 11:35 AM BST
It could be a non-story, like say some sligo player backs cork to win the all-ireland, it's probably against the sports guidlines but not corrupt.
Report db1974 July 28, 2012 11:48 AM BST
The article does state The International Olympic Committee's (IOC) code of conduct specifically outlaws this practice.

I would call it naivety unless the Irish competitor was at the sharp end of the competition
Report Bassanio July 28, 2012 12:00 PM BST
It's says both bets were successful.

No medal has been decided yet so what is that all about?
Report Bassanio July 28, 2012 12:01 PM BST
Sorry I had a quick read and I see that they are referring to a previous competition.
Report silvergreaser July 28, 2012 12:13 PM BST
Its the price which leads me to believe somebody knew something?, its not as if the bets were placed on a 5/4 shot, 12/1 was pretty tasty odds to be putting on decent cash.
Report reb July 28, 2012 12:26 PM BST
The size of the bet and the fact that it was accepted by the "large bookmaker" suggest that better odds may have been avalable elsewhere.
Report reb July 28, 2012 12:26 PM BST
available !!
Report Blackwater July 28, 2012 12:56 PM BST
If he placed the bets on his own account then it's probably a case of stupidity rather than corruption.

Presumably the bookie reported the transaction. Would this have happened if the bet had lost? Just wondering.
Report db1974 July 28, 2012 1:23 PM BST
12/1 is not that big really though if you knew, say, that one of the shorter-priced favourites was ill or injured or whatever. Some of the sports at the Olympics have 2 short-priced competitors at the head of the market followed by the 3rd-fav at double figs, especially where there is no each-way betting. Inside information as opposed to non-trier stuff

All speculation on my part of course. If it's non-trier stuff then that's totally different.
Report silvergreaser July 28, 2012 1:33 PM BST
It would help if we knew the sport involved, as it is we're just surmising.
Report Anaglogs Daughter July 28, 2012 4:49 PM BST
The competitor is seen to have made a credit card deposit of €300 into their personal betting account.
Three minutes later, they place a bet of €41 at 12/1, backing an opponent to win gold. Roughly 20 minutes later, they then place a second bet of €259 backing the same opponent at the same price.
The following day, they went into competition against that opponent. Records show that the first bet brought a winning return of €533 and the second one €3,367.
Report silvergreaser July 28, 2012 11:41 PM BST
Boxing!
Report Rocketfingers July 29, 2012 12:15 AM BST
Yap has to Silvergreaser, the world championships were only weeks ago, i'm guessing it was in this.
Report Arklearkle July 29, 2012 1:33 AM BST
Doubt it was boxing. Because of odds I would imagine it was something with a number of contestants in the field.
Report bleekerstreet July 29, 2012 8:59 AM BST
Maybe someone working with the bookmaker thought it a good idea to flog details of bet to paper ! An act of stupidity on behalf of the athlete for sure but those responsible for releasing the story should examine their own motives .
Report mrcombustible July 29, 2012 10:06 AM BST
Peter O'leary    silly boy
Report wixim July 29, 2012 10:10 AM BST
Some performance to get 300 quid on at 12s with spoils !
Report lustrumm July 29, 2012 10:17 AM BST
Knew it would have to be Spoils but was afraid to post in case of getting it wrong. Jeez they are some wrong ones. I know it was strictly wrong but of one is a punter and has a keen knowledge of a sport it must be tempting to step in. I'll bet there was no suggestion of "throwing" his own chance
Report lustrumm July 29, 2012 10:18 AM BST
I also read he is the grandson of Archie O Leary of Florida Pearl fame
Report bobbybocala July 29, 2012 10:59 AM BST
Thought it might hav been one of our boxers..... Maybe placing a bet on the Leinster bare knuckle championships.....doing a 300 treble baldy James Quinn,Dinny McGinley and Big Paul Joyce in their respective fights.....the world would be gone completely mad....if they didn't allow ya have a few bob on one of your cousins.....
Report JayTrumpOldTomDubbl July 29, 2012 11:25 AM BST
Spot on there bobby Wink
And rocketfingers got it wrong !!  has this happened before, rocket to be wrong ?
Report Rocketfingers July 29, 2012 11:31 AM BST
Not in a while Jay just look at my Laois thread for yesterday Cool, to be fair i'm amazed you could get 300 on a 12/1 in a sailing contest on one account but there you go.
Report Anaglogs Daughter July 29, 2012 11:41 AM BST
SAILOR: Peter O'Leary accused in betting scandal
Bet claims made out of vengeance -- Olympian
Allegations about O'Leary 'made for maximum negative impact'

Sunday July 29 2012

Solicitors acting for the Irish athlete at the heart of the alleged Olympic betting scandal that has rocked Ireland's Olympic bid have rejected the complaint and said it was made 48 hours before the Games opened to cause the "maximum negative impact" on Cork sailor Peter O'Leary.


The well-known sailor who is competing in his second Olympics is the boyfriend of hurdler Derval O'Rourke.

Mr O'Leary has been accused of placing two bets backing an opponent to win an event at the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008 in which he directly competed.

Mr O'Leary, who qualified for the Olympics in 2011, is due to make his first appearance at the 2012 Games later today alongside his teammate David Burrows.

A series of high-level discussions took place yesterday between Olympic Council of Ireland (OCI) boss Pat Hickey and members of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), who have reportedly demanded a "full explanation" into the affair.

It is believed the Ethics Committee of the International Olympic Committee are satisfied the complaint was taken seriously by the Irish organisation and are preparing to nominate someone to carry out a full investigation.

The IOC's code of conduct specifically outlaws the practice of betting against yourself.

An IOC spokeswoman said last night: "We have seen the media report. The IOC has looked into the matter and is in contact with the Irish Olympic Council. The case is not related to an Olympic event."

Ranked 20th in the world, Mr O'Leary was born on March 29, 1983, and has been described as "one of Ireland's most talented sailors".

He came sixth at the ISAF Youth Worlds in 2001 and won Irish Sailor of the Year in 2007. He comes from a famous Cork sailing bloodline, being the grandson of Archie O'Leary, who is the founder of the well-known O'Leary Insurance brokerage in Cork.

Mr Hickey confirmed they had received an allegation concerning one of the competitors; however, insiders have said it was decided to "park" the issue until after the Games concluded.

The email was sent to the OCI on July 21, from a named email address. The OCI took legal advice and were told Mr O'Leary had to be informed of the allegations. His solicitors replied that the allegations had been made out of "vengeance and spite" and said the allegations were made to cause Mr O'Leary "maximum negative impact" just 48 hours before he was due to compete in the Games.

However, more detailed information has been supplied alleging that the athlete placed two separate bets, both backing a specific opponent to claim victory in a competition he himself was entered in.

It is claimed that the bets, at a price of 12/1, were placed the day before their competition started and both were successful, netting €3,600. The money was collected from ****, Castle Street, Cork on August 27, 2008, according to the allegations.

There was anger in government circles that no one was made aware of the allegations so close to the 2012 Games. Speaking from London yesterday, Sport Minister Leo Varadkar hoped it did not "mar" morale in the Irish team.

"I only learnt about it today from the Irish Independent and don't know the details. I understand it's being investigated and I really hope it does not mar team morale at the start of what should be a great Olympics."

Junior Sport Minister Michael Ring said yesterday he too was in the dark, but it was a matter for the OCI.

"I hope this is put to bed quickly and does not spoil the Olympics," he said. This incident comes days after Mr Hickey became only the second Irishman to become a member of the executive committee of the IOC.

While making no comment yesterday, Mr Hickey told the Irish Independent on Friday night that the council sought legal advice on the matter and were told that they had a duty "under the rules of natural justice" to inform the competitor of the allegation being made.

It received a detailed letter from Mr O'Leary's solicitor last Thursday and a full investigation is under way.

Mr O'Leary's lawyers, Ronan Daly Jermyn, said the emergence of the allegations 48 hours before the games were designed to cause the "maximum negative impact possible".

The email sent to the OCI alleges that Mr O'Leary made a credit card deposit of €300 into his personal betting account. It claimed that three minutes later, he placed a bet of €41 at 12/1, backing an opponent to win gold.

Roughly 20 minutes later a second bet of €259 backing the same opponent at the same price was allegedly made. The following day, Mr O'Leary went into competition against that opponent.

Records show that the first bet brought a winning return of €533 and the second one €3,367.

An OCI spokesman said the council has informed the athlete, whom it will not name, about an anonymous allegation that two bets were made in favour of an opponent in an unspecified sport prior to the Olympics. The spokesman said it was now a legal issue and that the council would not make any further comment.

- DANIEL McCONNELL CHIEF REPORTER INDEPENDENT.IE
Report JayTrumpOldTomDubbl July 29, 2012 12:10 PM BST
Great call yesterday re-Laois rocket, well done on that, and never really in doubt from throw in...........
Report lustrumm July 29, 2012 3:59 PM BST
As it happens O Leary out in front at the turn in his class (Star class) and miles clear after a mill behind at the turn. Finished second this morning and looks in great shape.

Commentator just described him as a great man for the horses and also unwittingly said "putting his money where his mouth is today"
Report moneypenny July 29, 2012 4:40 PM BST
spoils traders must have lost the plot that day. 300 at 12/1 how the phuck did he get that on
Report bobbybocala July 29, 2012 4:48 PM BST
what ever happened client confidentiality?.....doesnt say much for boyyles method of doing business.....paddy peowers wouldnt give him up.....when they took the 2m off the fellow from the post office......they didnt go to the papers....or report him to gamcare.....fair play to paddy.....
Report Cupwinkcook July 29, 2012 5:02 PM BST
All the nice girls love a sailor....
Report Eddie Batt July 29, 2012 5:22 PM BST
Spoils waited 4 years with this -despicable.
Report keen leader July 29, 2012 6:07 PM BST
to put things into context, o leary was priced at 500/1 to win the event, 33/1 to medal. ie a no hoper. he may have seen all the main contenders in training and took a punt on the eventual winner at 12/1, as after all your average trading room would not have a clue about sailing let alone how to price a sailing race.

the scandal here is not that he had the bet, that the confidential bet was released to a press source. i wonder would one of the boyle traders such as mssrs hayes or hassett who post here care to comment. doubt it.

look at it this way, if an inter county hurler from say perhaps carlow or laois(2 counties with in reality no chance of winning a senior all ireland) decide to have a decent bet on one of the real contenders winning, does this constitute a scandal...not at all.

the only thing this story highlights, is that b..oyles clearly have very poor control and low standards.

can gimmeabreak answer if there will be an internal investigation and can we expect a dismissal and a public apology from the company to the client?
Report moneypenny July 29, 2012 6:10 PM BST
fair point kl, but surely the bigger question is how spoils allowed a bet of that size on an event they would know nothing about.
Report Bassanio July 29, 2012 6:16 PM BST
That is not a bigger question moneypenny, it is simply a question and a puzzle.

The release of the information about the bet is far far more important.
Report Eddie Batt July 29, 2012 6:17 PM BST
I think Keen Leader has hit the nail on the head-was this leak officially sanctioned-if not who leaked it and what action will be taken to ensure private betting details remain private.
Report Anaglogs Daughter July 29, 2012 6:48 PM BST
They would do anything to get in the paper...Paddy goes world wide by taking on and beating LOCOG . .Their reply...Let's destroy IrelandSad
Report lustrumm July 29, 2012 7:00 PM BST
The story smells imo.

The British won Gold in 2008 in the Star Class (which is the Blue Riband event in sailing and attracts most of the Worlds top sailors)and had previously won Gold at Sydney (albeit in a different class)

The Sailors are Ben Ainslie Iain Percy (see attached wiki page)and they have dominated Sailing for many years and at least the last 3 Olympics that I have followed.
They won the Gold at Beijing and would have been odds on.

for example in the Star class event (This is the event that O leary competed in at Beijing) on today the commentator said the event is a clean match between the established Briton and the up and coming Brazilians. The betting was 4/9 and 7/4.

How were the English 12/1 to win Gold in Beijing?

Also I clicked on a sailing event just now on a virgin Paddies account and could have €49 on an event at 7/2. So to win £150 sterling. Hard to see how anyone could win €3.5K on an event to be honest



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iain_Percy
Report Ozymandius July 29, 2012 7:25 PM BST
No surprise I suppose that the punter is getting unanimous support on here, I suppose!


1.  I know this is a betting forum, and therefore any chance to have a dig at a bookmaker is delightfully seized upon, but how do we know Spoils blew the whistle here, as has been suggested by many? 

Could just as easily be from  disgruntled friend or associate or compeditor to whom O'Leary bragged about the bet to.  Lets face it if he is dumb enough to have the bet in his own name in the first place he is no doubt dumb enough to be shouting his mouth off about it.

2. As regards punter confidentiality, surely if there is a legal investigation a bookmaker is obliged to release records?

3.  I don't know the rules are about betting in inter county hurling but I imagine every athlete is signed up to very stringent set of rules regarding gambling at the Olympics.  Whether he himself is 500/1 or more, is, I believe, irrelevant.

Not enough details have emerged yet but on the bare bones of the story to date, he deserves whatever comes his way.
Report Rocketfingers July 29, 2012 7:46 PM BST
This is a lesson for all sports men and women to be a little more street when it comes to putting on money in an event they are connected to.
Report wildmanfromborneo July 29, 2012 7:53 PM BST
As it wasn`t illegal at the time seems a storm in a teacup.The fact he made no effort to hide his wager shows it was transparent and within the rules,the bet must have hurt though hence the vindictiveness.
Report Ozymandius July 29, 2012 8:02 PM BST
I don't follow any of that post, Borneo?  Are you having a larf?

1.  Why do you claim it wasn't illegal at the time?  This is contrary to what is stated in the above articles.

2.  The 'transparency' that you mention  suggests stupidity or at best naivety rather than 'being within the rules'.

3.  The source of the vindictiveness of the whistleblower is unknown, it is not necessarily the bet.
Report wildmanfromborneo July 29, 2012 8:06 PM BST
No i am being serious,the rules on betting are recent and didn`t apply then,the fact he made no attempt to conceal his identity meant he certainly was unaware of such rules,the final bit was conjecture on my behalf.
Report Rocketfingers July 29, 2012 8:09 PM BST
I seen Borneo put up so many losers that he can't possibly have a chip on his shoulder about any bookmaker refusing any sort of bet from him. Yesterday's was an all time low tipping a division 4 team to beat a division 1 and only getting 2 points on the handicap. Laugh

It came from a paper first? I would say it's 50/50 if it was spoils or not.
Report Ozymandius July 29, 2012 8:14 PM BST
If what you claim is true and rules on beting are recent and did not apply 4 year ago (seems bizzare) one would have though that this might have been mentioned in the article??? 

No doubt the rules have evolved but this is a fairly fundamental breach I would have imagined and likely to have been covered by the rules 4 years ago.
Report Anaglogs Daughter July 29, 2012 8:15 PM BST
While the OCI is – as yet – merely in receipt of an anonymous email making the allegation, the Irish Independent has taken possession of detailed documentary evidence suggesting the competitor used their personal account with a large bookmaking firm to place two separate bets, both backing a specific opponent to claim victory in a competition they themselves were entered in.

Yeah right he sent it himself..Mischief
Report surazal July 29, 2012 8:16 PM BST
Regarding the source of the allegation ,surely the details of the bet(s) are too detailed to have come from any other source than the bookie in question. Would love to see the PR manager for said company spin that to a dubious Irish public.
Report wildmanfromborneo July 29, 2012 8:18 PM BST
I know to my cost that i tend to post like i speak,off the cuff so i could be wrong but these new rules about betting are relatively new.
Report Ozymandius July 29, 2012 8:18 PM BST
Cats well and truly put of the bag AD, with the IOC investigation launched, only a matter of time before these details made public anyway.
Report Rocketfingers July 29, 2012 8:18 PM BST
Missed that, ya i agree AD if that's true there is no doubt who the whistle blowers were.
Report Ozymandius July 29, 2012 8:20 PM BST
ahhh..jaysus.... Borneo Laugh
Report bobbybocala July 29, 2012 8:28 PM BST
Thought wonky was the thickest on here..... Ozymandius runs him close with the shiit he talks....
Report wildmanfromborneo July 29, 2012 8:29 PM BST
The fact he made no effort to conceal his identity would suggest to me he the new rules were not in place then.
Report Blackwater July 29, 2012 8:30 PM BST
I agree with Ozy that we shouldn't assume the leak started with the bookmaker.

If the guy was stupid enough to place a bet on his own account, he may have been stupid enough to boast about his winnings.

Certainly the timing speaks to a certain vindictiveness on the part of the complainant.

This bloke certainly needs to make a public statement because the scandal won't die down until we find out how he got 300 quid on at 12/1 with Boilsports.
Report Ozymandius July 29, 2012 8:30 PM BST
The whistleblower here is surely the person who sent the mail to the IOC on the 21st.

Since then his betting statement from the period will have been perused by many different parties...his solicitor, people at the Irish Olmypic Office etc etc and will be made public in a matter of time. 

I would feel differently about it if the leaking of his betting records caused the original investigation, it didn't.
Report wildmanfromborneo July 29, 2012 8:30 PM BST
These rules cannot be made retrospective.
Report Ozymandius July 29, 2012 8:34 PM BST
We need to differentiate between the 'whistleblower' and the 'source of his betting records' for the clarity of the discussion.  Two separate events imo.
Report Eddie Batt July 29, 2012 8:34 PM BST
I agree with bobbybocola-ozymandius is a confused/clueless individual.
Report Ozymandius July 29, 2012 8:35 PM BST
Laugh
Report Rocketfingers July 29, 2012 8:39 PM BST
Lads did this not happen weeks ago?
Report bobbybocala July 29, 2012 8:43 PM BST
Firstly the guy o Leary hasn't committed any offence....he may have broken the sports rules ..... But that's it..... Boyyles are under no obligation to do anything.....they don't hav to release his records to anybody..... The guards aren't involved here.....details of his bet could not possibly have been released by anyone .....except boyyles .......
Report wildmanfromborneo July 29, 2012 8:44 PM BST
Rocketfingers stick to your fantasy Asian markets.
Ozymandias is neither confused or clueless and asked legitimate questions,surprised at Eddie Batt as he is normally a brilliant poster.
Report Ozymandius July 29, 2012 8:59 PM BST
Bobby,

In response to this email arriving form the whistleblower on the 21st. O'leary will no doubt have requested his betting records from the period.  They will have been widely circulated, to him, to the office of his solicitor, to the Offices of the Irish Olympic Committee etc etc etc. In short floating around everywhere for a week.  There are many potential sources for the leak, including but not limited to the bookmaker. 

O'Leary is not contesting that he placed the bets, so the fact that the records are public now is irrelevant.  They would have come out as part of an enquiry anyway.

Surely the more interesting parts of the story are:

1.  Who is the original whistleblower?

2.  What will happen to O'Leary?
Report bobbybocala July 29, 2012 9:42 PM BST
Original whistleblower is boyyles .....no betting.....what will happen o Leary .....he will go back to his millionaire playboy lifestyle......be still shagging dervla.....don't think he'l b overly upset.....
Report lustrumm July 29, 2012 9:48 PM BST
Plenty of tripe posted here but not 1 comment on my earlier post. Keyboard warriors in full cry tonight
Report Ozymandius July 29, 2012 9:50 PM BST
The email sent to the OCI alleges that Mr O'Leary made a credit card deposit of €300 into his personal betting account. It claimed that three minutes later, he placed a bet of €41 at 12/1, backing an opponent to win gold.

I hadn't caught that bit of the report tbf.  The original report I read suggested that the details pertaining to the account had subsequently been made available to the Indo, as opposed to being part of the initial e-mail to the IOC.

It seems to me that reporting of the facts of the story is vascillating.  Either that or I have not been reading accurately.
Report Ozymandius July 29, 2012 10:00 PM BST
While the OCI is – as yet – merely in receipt of an anonymous email making the allegation, the Irish Independent has taken possession of detailed documentary evidence suggesting the competitor used their personal account with a large bookmaking firm

I read that to mean that the details of the account were not in the original email to the IOC.

Anyway..I have said enough on the subject, I shall pipe down now!
Report Anywherebutcheltenham July 30, 2012 12:06 AM BST
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/olympics/2525664/Fears-of-corruption-as-UK-alone-could-gamble-25m-on-Beijing-Olympics.html

Beijing marks the first Games at which gambling by athletes is banned. New IOC rules mean athletes have to sign a declaration as part of their official entry that they will not bet on the Games.

I'm not sure what the sanctions were in 2008, but it's clear he broke the rules.
Report db1974 July 30, 2012 12:09 AM BST
So **** isn't on the list of banned websites in China then anyway!
Report Ozymandius July 30, 2012 10:51 AM BST
Temporary or permanent exclusion from the Games appears to be the potential relevant penalty.
Report lustrumm July 30, 2012 11:24 AM BST
No question he broke the rules but I still can't reconcile the price.

Unless it was a rick and he being a punter and a world class sailor recognised it straightaway and although knowing he was wrong could not resist it at the price.

The double bet means one of 2 things

1. He had someone on the inside who took the clamp off the market after the first bet. After all this was a once in a lifetime opportunity to back an even money shot at 12/1
2. There was an IT glitch that allowed the refer to trader messaqe be overridden.

The first bet was to win a monkey which is probably about right.

The second bet makers no sense all things being equal.

also where does Vincent Hogan stand in this. Credit for holding onto the story until the Saturday (he was given the information on Tuesday or a wrong one for running it at all?

There is more to this than meets the eye as I keep saying
Report wildmanfromborneo July 30, 2012 12:28 PM BST
The biggest losing punters are now sport stars,they have plenty of money and tend to be Rocketfingers like in the brains department so maybe the firm who laid the bet were hoping to acquire some of these clients,that could also explain the vindictiveness when the bonanza didn't materialise.
Report Anaglogs Daughter July 30, 2012 12:56 PM BST
Olympic chiefs probe betting scandal claims

INTERNATIONAL Olympics chiefs are now investigating the allegations of a betting scandal in the Irish squad.

It follows yesterday's statement from sources close to sailor Peter O'Leary that he had bet on a rival in a race in the Beijing Olympics -- but described it as a "naive mistake".

Mr O'Leary yesterday refused to answer questions in person about allegations of illegal betting that have cast such a cloud over the Irish team this week in the wake of revelations by the Irish Independent.

Solicitors acting on Mr O'Leary's behalf have rejected the claims, suggesting they were made "to cause the maximum negative impact" on the sailor.

The ethics watchdog of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) -- the umbrella body for the Games -- last night confirmed it was investigating the case.

It is alleged that Mr O'Leary placed two bets on an opponent he was competing directly against at the 2008 Games, both successful at 12/1.

The bets of €41 and €259 were made through his personal account with a legal bookmaker and brought a winning return of close to €4,000.

The IOC specifically introduced a rule for Beijing outlawing Olympic competitors betting against themselves in competition.

The Olympic Council of Ireland (OCI) issued a statement yesterday revealing that they had requested "a full disclosure of documentation from the person making the allegation so that the allegation can be investigated in a fair and proper manner".

The revelation came after Mr O'Leary and his crewman David Burrows had a successful first day in the water, leaving them second overall in the Star class.

Hooded, and eyes hidden behind sunglasses, Mr O'Leary swept through the 'mixed zone' staring at his feet, with sailing's High Performance Manager, James O'Callaghan, by his side.

When asked why Mr O'Leary would not be stopping, he said "no reason". Competitors are compelled to walk through mixed zones, but have no obligation to stop and talk to media.

Mr O'Leary and Mr Burrows are strongly fancied to win Ireland's first sailing medal since David Wilkins and James Wilkinson took silver in Moscow 32 years ago.

Some sources close to Mr O'Leary, preferring not to be named, issued a statement in support of the Corkman yesterday, describing his bets in Beijing as "a naive mistake".

Describing Mr O'Leary as "a rookie" at those Games, they "said he was not competing in the medal race so he was not in a position to influence the result".

Furthermore, the statement suggested that Olympic rules on betting changed "about a year ago" and that, at the time, Mr O'Leary was not breaking any rules.

However, to compete in Beijing, all competitors had to sign a declaration that specifically outlaws betting on events in which you are competing.

A spokesman for the OCI refused to comment on the statements by sources close to Mr O'Leary. However, the spokesman denied claims that the rules governing athletes making bets had only been changed a year ago. "They came in at Beijing and continue to this day," he said.

The OCI's code of ethics prohibits participating athletes from betting on Olympic events and anyone found to be in violation of this rule can be either temporarily or permanently excluded from the Games.

The person against whom allegations have been made has the right to details of the claims and to appear before a disciplinary commission or to submit a defence in writing.

Meanwhile, Mr O'Leary has received a total of €128,621 in grant funding from the Irish Sports Council since 2001. A spokesman for the council said Mr O'Leary was an outstanding sportsman and had received a number of high-performance grants in recent years.

However, he refused to say if current or future funding could be in doubt if Mr O'Leary was found to have breached any Olympic rules.

- Vincent Hogan IRISHINDEPENDENT.IE in Weymouth
Report Anaglogs Daughter July 30, 2012 1:01 PM BST
Solicitors acting on Mr O'Leary's behalf have rejected the claims, suggesting they were made "to cause the maximum negative impact" on the sailor

That's the point that gets me. Why the feck when the Irish team are parading at the opening ceremony that this story goes to press. Whoever leaked this story has in my view committed a graver sin that they wanted to destroy Irelands chances of winning anything. OK what the sailor is alleged to have done was illegal and should be punished if it is indeed fact but i thnk whoever leaked the story deserves to be named and then shamed because they solely it seems hates to see Ireland do well at the Olympics..
Report db1974 July 30, 2012 1:12 PM BST
^ that's the thing that pisses me off about it too. It's real English tabloid stuff.
Report tobywong. July 30, 2012 1:15 PM BST
^^ yes very true , the standard of sports journalism in this country is getting lower all the time.
Report ballaman68 July 30, 2012 4:23 PM BST
The timing of the leak and the source of the leak are interesting to say the least.

Clearly someone has had this information for some time and only now saw fit to make the allegation in order to get maximum exposure.

If the leak is from the bookie then there are serious questions to be answered in relation to client confedeniality and data protection laws.

At the end of all this, i fear that the paper, bookie/leaker and the athlete will all come out with egg on their faces.
Report Ozymandius July 30, 2012 4:32 PM BST
I am not sure that the tabloid analogy is fair here.  There is a genuine story here.  The timing of it is unfortunate but that is down to the person who sent the original email to the IOC rather than the press.   I don't think the papers could realistically sit on this story.
Report ballaman68 July 30, 2012 5:07 PM BST
Well for me the timing is anything but unfortunate, to me its well timed for maximum effect. I also think that its not a front page story at all. Theres no illegality in what happened and it happened four years ago, why did the informer wait so long to bring this travesty of justice to light.

He may well have broken some IOC rules and will pay the price if thats the case, seems to me to be a nice betting coup/touch, there are far more important stories out there is the journalists could get off their arses and make an effort.

Totally over the top senationalism from the tabloid that is the Indo.
Report Anaglogs Daughter July 31, 2012 11:43 AM BST
Irishindependent.ie 31/July/2012

FRIENDS of Irish sailor Peter O'Leary have claimed he was the target of a blatant attempt to sabotage his Olympic medal bid.

Donal McClement, a respected Royal Cork Yacht Club (RCYC) sailor and close friend of the O'Leary family, last night said that only "a sick and twisted mind" could have released such allegations.

His comments came as Cork's sailing community rallied behind O'Leary, who shrugged off the controversy to come second in his first race at Weymouth in the UK.

But he again refused to answer questions about illegal betting allegations as he and crewman David Burrows slipped to fifth in the Olympic Star class.

The Corkman walked past media without speaking and has indicated to sailing officials that he will not be stopping for interviews while the betting topic remains live.

Mr O'Leary is alleged to have placed successful bets on an opponent to win gold in an event he himself was competing in at the Beijing Olympics. Such a practice contravenes the IOC charter and could theoretically lead to expulsion if proven.

Having been in silver medal position overnight, O'Leary and Burrows had a miserable race three yesterday, finishing 14th. But a fifth-place finish in race four places them fifth overall and still in strong medal contention.

O'Leary's solicitors, Cork-based firm Ronan Daly Jermyn, did not comment further on the controversy yesterday.

The firm had earlier said the allegations lodged with the Irish Olympic Committee were motivated by "vengeance and spite".

Meanwhile, O'Leary's childhood friend Mr McClement revealed the upset felt by family and friends.

"What kind of a person waits until just two days before the Olympics to release these kinds of claims? Only a sick and twisted mind is capable of this kind of thing," he said.

Mr McClement said he "could not disagree" that the claims may have been an attempt to sabotage O'Leary's medal bid.

"He (Peter) is one of the finest young sailors in the world, and along with (boxer) Katie Taylor, is probably our best hope of a medal at the London Games," he said

Mr O'Leary's father Anthony is in the UK to support his son -- while RCYC and Kinsale Yacht Club members have flooded the family with messages of support.

Just last month, O'Leary who is the boyfriend of fellow Cork athlete Derval O'Rourke, took time out from his Olympic preparations to support Cork Week -- the flagship regatta organised biannually by the RCYC.

He raced with his father at the Crosshaven event. His brother, Nicholas, is also a talented sailor and is expected to be in contention for a future Olympic squad.

- Ralph Riegel and Vincent Hogan
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