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08 Jun 21 11:17
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Date Joined: 06 Jul 10
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Brexit sausage war as Tories attack EU banger ban - that they allowed.

The UK and EU face a furious Brexit battle over sausages after Tory ministers started attacking a Brussels ban on bangers.

UK farmers are already banned from sending the meaty snack to the Continent under post-Brexit rules.

But now the clock is ticking on trade from Britain to Northern Ireland too - as it was only allowed under a six-month grace period.

That grace period expires at the end of June - after that, certain "chilled meat preparations" may be barred from going west across the Irish Sea.

If it's not resolved it's feared this could lead to supply gaps in Belfast supermarket. It includes chilled mince, chicken nuggets and chilled raw sausages, plus ungraded eggs and some unpasteurised milk.

The meaty impasse was already clear last year - because Tory ministers first agreed to put Northern Ireland under some EU rules, then agreed their post-Brexit trade deal without resolving the issue.




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By:
macarony
When: 08 Jun 21 11:35
100 million pound investment in a cheese factory in wales to produce local and continental cheese, swings and roundabouts as production becomes more local
By:
PorcupineorPineapple
When: 08 Jun 21 11:38
Not the fault of the current government. They need to go back to those who negotiated the deal and ask them why they agreed to something that was so detrimental to our interests.
By:
macarony
When: 08 Jun 21 11:42
Whitehall have never ever negotiated any trade deal in Britain's favor
By:
lapsy pa
When: 08 Jun 21 12:53
Frost negotiated the deal and is now complaining about it,that is bordering on comedy.
Eu's rhetoric cranked up in the last hour that the agreed international treaty isn't getting implemented and Biden postponing any notion of a trade deal, looks like it could kick off this week.
By:
edy
When: 08 Jun 21 13:02
Always read contracts before you sign them.
By:
Wallflower
When: 08 Jun 21 14:14
I wish they would stop going on and on about it as if its the EU's fault.  EU has moved on we are just another '3rd country' - - we are treated the same as everyone else - nothing else other than our signed agreements with the EU matter. Its what we wanted, or more specifically what England wanted.

Many on here are obsessed with EU, they are not in the least bit obsessed with us, we are just an annoyance (bit of a joke tbh). We are not special, we have "the best in the world" in sweet f*ck all, even though we keep telling ourselves that we do.

Can we not just shut-up and live with what we opted for, and stop continually making a nuisance of ourselves?  It just gets more and more embarrassing.
By:
macarony
When: 08 Jun 21 14:18
I was thinking that people have moved on even the BBC no longer as its usual 2/4 anti Brexit stories a day. For me the whole idea of Brexit was to have less to do with the EU. These trade deals are important today but not in the future, climate concerns will see to that.
By:
edy
When: 08 Jun 21 14:23
There are worse things than an obsession with the EU.

E.g recently France put up some covid travel restrictions for UK folks and some people went all "BUT THE WAR! The Frenchies need to know their place!"
By:
bigpoppapump
When: 08 Jun 21 14:36
the anti-European English nationalism which drove Brexit isn't something you can dissuade people from, on the basis of practicalities (like what was agreed wrt sausages, for example).  English nationalism is about nostalgia for a past which never existed. The replacement for the Empire, our leading role in Europe, has now been ditched, but what it was ditched for remains to be seen.  It's definitely of no concern to the idealists of the English nationalist movement whether Northern Ireland gets its sausages, or indeed whether the whole Province gets sheared off.  Taking back control is a nice fat meaningless slogan; details like sausages are irrelevant.
By:
mrtopnotch
When: 08 Jun 21 14:52
Bamboozled Britain dishes out Brexit blame

Fintan O’Toole, The Irish Times, 25th May 2021

If Brexit is so wonderful, why does anyone have to be blamed for its consequences? Because performative victimhood has always been at its heart. One thing has never, ever, been in doubt: it would all be someone else’s fault. The very things that Britain demanded and negotiated would be reconfigured as the perverse malignity of foreigners – the Irish, the French, the EU in general.

In May 2013, a British newspaper columnist wrote that “If we left the EU . . . we would have to recognise that most of our problems are not caused by ‘Bwussels’ (sic), but by chronic British short-termism . . . a culture of easy gratification and underinvestment in both human and physical capital and infrastructure.”

Thus wrote that great enemy of easy gratification, Boris Johnson. He was inadvertently predicting the very dilemma that Brexit would create for British, and indirectly for Irish, politics: what do you do when “Bwussels” can no longer be blamed?

The short-term answer is: blame it anyway. For both the Tories and the DUP, the habit is too deeply ingrained to be broken. The Northern Ireland protocol, which they created, is all the fault of Dublin and Brussels.

It is hard, admittedly, to figure out how much of the current discourse about the protocol among the Brexiteers is rooted in genuine ignorance and how much is a cynical pretence not to know what it meant.

The first possibility can never be discounted. I was watching last week’s appearance before a House of Commons committee of an unelected bureaucrat of the kind that Brexit was meant to overthrow. Lord Frost, never elected to anything, has been appointed Lord Brexit.

Boris Johnson’s EU minister, David Frost, says he will not rest until the protocol is torn up.

The part of his evidence that attracted attention was his tragicomic announcement that the British government is seeking an outside expert to help it identify the benefits of Brexit. A bit late, no? But there was a moment that was even more gobsmacking.

Sincere witlessness

A Tory MP, Richard Drax (aka Richard Grosvenor Plunkett-Ernle-Erle-Drax), actually asked Frost this question: “How are you getting on with bilateral agreements with other EU members? . . . Are you having any success in those?”

Frost seemed embarrassed by the apparent belief of an MP that EU member states could make their own deals with the UK, so he just waffled that “I would say there is some way to go in that.”

Drax then said this: “Oh dear. Actually, part of my question was whether individual EU states were able to do bilateral agreements. I think you are hinting that perhaps they cannot with Big Brother sitting on their shoulder. That is a shame, but hopefully in the months and years ahead that will disappear – I am sure it will under your leadership, Lord Frost.” So genuine, unaffected, sincere witlessness cannot be ruled out.

There are fishermen who voted for Brexit now genuinely stunned to find that a consignment of shellfish being sent across the Channel needs health certificates in three languages. There are pensioners who voted for Brexit who cannot understand why they can’t go and live in Spain or France without having to fill out bloody forms.

This kind of ignorance is understandable. Brits have been told for decades that “red tape” was all the fault of “Bwussels”. The truth that Brexit means vastly more of it does not compute.

But there is also fake ignorance, a faux naivety being performed by Frost and Johnson. Normally, senior political figures would be ashamed to claim that they did not understand a treaty they negotiated, signed and hailed as a triumph.

Wily foreigners

Not this time. There is a strategic deployment of gormlessness to avoid the even worse option: taking responsibility for their own actions.

To keep alive the idea that someone else is to blame, there has to be a story of artless, innocent Britain bamboozled into signing things it did not understand. In this narrative, world-beating Great Britain becomes a guileless ingenue taken advantage of by wily foreigners.

Thus, as Frost told the Commons committee, the EU “seems to want to treat goods moving to Northern Ireland from the rest of the UK in the same way as the arrival of a vast Chinese container ship at Rotterdam. We did not anticipate this when we agreed the protocol.”

This is not ignorance: pleading stupidity is deliberately disingenuous. The British government’s own explanatory note on the deal in December 2019 states: “Any processes normally required on goods entering the EU will be implemented at the Northern Ireland/rest of world border.”

The British sense of being deeply wronged is always marked by the obsessive return to the second World War. Sure enough, last week, counsel for the unionist parties in Northern Ireland claimed in court that the operation of the protocol “can be likened to the position of the Vichy regime which was relied on to do the bidding of the occupiers”.

The Nazis made us sign the protocol. Makes a change, I suppose, from the Irish. But the bad news is that this stuff is not going to go away because it is rooted in the deepest emotion of Brexit: self-pity. It is all about imagining Britain as a victim. It is, of course – not of “Bwussels”, but of its own home-grown delusions and deceptions.
By:
Cider
When: 08 Jun 21 15:35
A lot of hate on one page.

Perhaps the author wants the protocol ditched, and for the EU to put the border up across Ireland instead.
By:
edy
When: 08 Jun 21 15:39
Hate? Plain

And a lot of it even? Plain
By:
Cider
When: 08 Jun 21 15:42
yup.
By:
edy
When: 08 Jun 21 15:44
One needs a heavy dose of self-pity or a big urge to display the own nation as the victim of wily foreigners to read "a lot of hate" into that piece.
By:
edy
When: 08 Jun 21 15:44
What exactly is meant to be so terribly hateful?
By:
Cider
When: 08 Jun 21 15:49
These compromises were enforced due to the hollow threat of EU putting up a border. Where has the author referenced this at all? Or reference the concessions that Irish citizens enjoy who reside in the UK.

The EU doesn't NEED to apply rigorous checks on goods moving east to west in the UK. It WANTS to. Does the author dig into WHY. No sane person thinks they could be substandard. So what are the motives.
By:
Cider
When: 08 Jun 21 15:53
My Mum is one of those Irish citizens who has benefited from concessions that they receive living in the UK. So I should know. But the piece is laced with bitterness and hate.
By:
edy
When: 08 Jun 21 15:55
How do you enforce something with hollow threats?

Either way, the point and irony is more that the UK, and particularly Lord Frost, signed on to it, only to now moan about what they signed. If you don't like it, don't sign it. Not that hard.

Or at least man up and own your **** that you negotiated instead of whining about others being hateful meanies.
By:
Whisperingdeath
When: 08 Jun 21 15:57
I like my wurst although not currywurst!

I also like my bangers!
By:
Whisperingdeath
When: 08 Jun 21 15:58
You know God could not be a muslim or a jew if you tasted proper Englisk pork sangers!
By:
lapsy pa
When: 08 Jun 21 15:59
Fintan O'Toole and also Fergal Bowers generally very decent RTE journos who call it for what it is.

It is a harsh piece but the bottom line is you agreed to the checks,the EU are performing those rigorous checks for UK goods entering the EU.
The 50,000 extra customs officers were warned about.
By:
mrtopnotch
When: 08 Jun 21 15:59
We welcome the 110,000 English living in Ireland
I'm sure the 1.9million Brits living worldwide are welcomes and lovely people Love
By:
edy
When: 08 Jun 21 16:00
No sane person thinks they could be substandard.

Maybe not substandard in the UK, but substandard to the EU.

There are things that no sane person in the US would consider substandard, whereas in the EU (and UK) they are considered just that. The same applies the other way around.

The same will also happen over time with the UK deeming EU products substandard. Products that the EU thinks are splendidly awesome.

If the countries fail to come to an agree regarding common standards, checks are what will be implemented.
By:
Cider
When: 08 Jun 21 16:00
How do you enforce something with hollow threats?


Easy. If a bank robber goes into a bank with a gun with no bullets, and says give me all your money, the clerk will give the robber all the money. Anyone in possession of a brain cell knows that Irish peace has been used as leverage in the negotiations. It's overwhelmingly likely that the EU would never erect a hard border, but the theoretical risk could not be tolerated.
By:
edy
When: 08 Jun 21 16:01
...ok, it sounded to me like everyone knew it was hollow threats.

'Cuz if people in the bank know the robber had no bullets, if they knew it was hollow threats, they ain't giving him no money I don't think.
By:
Cider
When: 08 Jun 21 16:01
Maybe not substandard in the UK, but substandard to the EU.


bull sh1t. But I wouldn't expect you to write otherwise.
By:
edy
When: 08 Jun 21 16:02
Would you kind enough to explain that a bit more?
By:
Cider
When: 08 Jun 21 16:03
Which part?
By:
Whisperingdeath
When: 08 Jun 21 16:04
Who cares about Belfast Supermarkets

Bugger Belfast and all the people who think religion is more important than common decency to your fellow man!
By:
Whisperingdeath
When: 08 Jun 21 16:04
and lets keep our sausages for us but please can we have the Irish bangers too!
By:
Cider
When: 08 Jun 21 16:05
It certainly does not NEED to be any more than light touch spot checks.
By:
edy
When: 08 Jun 21 16:05
Cider • June 8, 2021 4:01 PM BST
Maybe not substandard in the UK, but substandard to the EU.


bull sh1t. But I wouldn't expect you to write otherwise.


This part.

Brexit is likely to lead to a deviation in standards. Britain can allow its pigs to eat some stuff that the EU, with its often precautionary principles, considers not safe. Similarly, the EU could allow widespread GMO stuff while the UK government says "....we don't like that stuff".
By:
edy
When: 08 Jun 21 16:07
Who says it is ever going to be more than light touch spot checks?

They ain't opening up every container and every package in every container.
By:
lapsy pa
When: 08 Jun 21 16:08
Exactly WD,a few Clonakiltys instead of them M&S Cumberland yokes would open their eyes, nose to spite your face there.
By:
Whisperingdeath
When: 08 Jun 21 16:08
hands off our spotted dick edy!

get your own!
By:
Whisperingdeath
When: 08 Jun 21 16:09
I was told by an Irishman that Irish beef was the best.

Is that true lapsy?
By:
Cider
When: 08 Jun 21 16:09
The EU knows what our standards are.

So NI could receive pork from Romania no checks but Scottish pork needs to be checked. Like I wrote, bull sh1t.
By:
mrtopnotch
When: 08 Jun 21 16:10
It appears that the recent heralding of a new Trade Yacht has come to a premature end. Under the recently agreed WTO "global procurement agreement", Liz Truss claimed that overseas groups could still bid for UK public sector contracts "delivering better value for UK taxpayers". Apparently under item 47 of annex 4 of UK schedule of GPA says procurement of "ships, boats & floating structures, except warships" must be advertised internationally & awarded without discrimination (by contrast US, Japan, Australia have exempted non-military ships from this obligation.

Now it seems that the UKs Defence ministry has been tasked with overseeing the project who plan to staff the yacht with Royal Navy personnel. However, this then gives other countries the right to take legal action either in UK courts or at the WTO.
Apparently shadow trade secretary Emily Thornberry said ministers had failed to take "the most basic and simple steps" to guarantee the boat could be built in Britain. "It is yet more copper-bottomed, ocean-going incompetence from Boris Johnson and Liz Truss."

Some fukking dopes Laugh
By:
Whisperingdeath
When: 08 Jun 21 16:10
So do Argentinian steak houses use Irish beef?
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