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Escapee
21 Mar 21 22:55
Joined:
Date Joined: 27 Aug 04
| Topic/replies: 2,482 | Blogger: Escapee's blog
Did a bit of google to try and answer this question myself.

I found zero scientific (peer reviewed) studies indicating catching 'it' twice was a thing.

I found small amounts of 'anecdotal' news paper reports of several ( less than 50 worldwide ) people having it twice,
and upon further enquiries, there was doubt about the subject getting it, getting rid of it, getting it again.

after a while, I was struck by the complete absence of scientific (peer reviewed) studies regardless of a yes or no conclusion.

I'm guessing the answer is no, because I'm also guessing there would be a lot of hullabaloo in the media about it if it was a twice thing.


Stupidly, I then googled why take a jab if you've already had it?
( I don't wanna go into the how's and why's a vaccine works, other than to mention it creates an 'immuno memory', same as having 'it' and thus
was curious why a jab would be needed if you already had the immuno memory )

and again, there was a complete absence of scientific (peer reviewed) studies and reasons why you'd need a jab if you already had it*
during this enquiry, the ever repeated phrase in the articles was "Experts Advise", although I could not find who or what the Experts were.


Can you catch 'it' twice?

Why have a jab if you've already had 'it'?




*Disclaimer,
I've had the AZ jab, I believe that vaccines work, there is 400 years of evidence vaccines work, with the caveat that current 'it' jabs are not conventional vaccines with 400 years of evidence behind them.

*Disclaimer 2
One of the reasons that advice is to get the jab even if you've had 'it' maybe because the tests for 'it' are not accurate, and thus better be safe
than risk 'it' on the accuracy or not of a test.
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Report Facts March 22, 2021 12:52 AM GMT
I read a while back, that the antibodies created as a result of catching the virus, were  shown to not last beyond  a max of 6 months.
Report Escapee March 22, 2021 1:20 AM GMT
"...antibodies created as a result of catching the virus, were  shown to not last beyond  a max of 6 months"

this sort of statement, assertion, is to be expected because.... well, its true, And it sounds 'important', so
it makes good media content, but it's a soundbite that doesn't indicate if we do or do not have some protection.


Antibodies don't live for ever, and the immune system doesn't keep mass producing them for every individual disease
it's ever encountered. So one would expect antibodies for 'it', and polio, tuberculosis and any other disease
you've encountered or had a childhood jab for to 'disappear' (diminish drastically in number) after X number of months.

What really protects us from these previously encountered or vaccinated diseases is our 'Immune Memory'.
The immune systems ability to remember how to manufacture antibodies for diseases it has previously had.
Unfortunately, this immune memory is not fully understood, so we cannot say how long it will last for 'it'.
But after 18 months, one would expect data either way as to if immune memory life span for 'it' is months or not.



Interestingly, during my enquiries, I found that some people still test positive for antibodies for the 1918 Spanish flu
( I don't know in what quantities ) so there is a possibility that immune memory is multi generational.
Report DenzilPenberthy March 22, 2021 1:21 AM GMT
Poor bait
Report Escapee March 22, 2021 1:29 AM GMT
Poor bait

what do you mean, what are you trying to convey?
Report DenzilPenberthy March 22, 2021 1:38 AM GMT
Because you ask a question that nobody can possibly know the answer to,you ask that question where it's never been established what 'it' is,you confuse the scenario by adding 'vaccines' into the OP,you do not reference any known future circumstance where 'vaccinated' folk are expected to create further variants,that further confuses 'it' which is expected to be synthetic version of a 'virus',what about any future wild virus? will that be labelled it? will 'experts' still confuse the 2? will it be 'wild' or 'synthetic' and how many synthetic versions will there be? and is germ theory proven 100%?
I thought you'd be aware of those things asking a question like that to try and catch someone out.
Report Escapee March 22, 2021 2:21 AM GMT
I asked 2 questions, which I have recently tried to find the answers to, without success.

But then I also got curious as to the lack of scientific data and or attempts to answer these questions.



"you ask a question that nobody can possibly know the answer to"

I disagree with your assertion.

Can you catch 'it' twice?

Surely this is answerable to the extent there have been 1 to 2 million deaths attributed to covid, at
a death rate of 1% that equates to 100 to 200 million cases. Even if only 2 - 5 million of those cases
have a reliable positive test, there is enough data to give a data based answer to if covid can be caught twice.




Why have a jab if you've already had 'it'?

The advice is to have the jab if even you've had covid.
I'm not disagreeing or agreeing, I'm just asking why, because it seems counter to my understanding of how a vaccine works.


If I were to ask your advice on a subject, is a subsequent "why" such a heinous question?
If you say WHY is a question that is unanswerable, then I'm likely going to categorise your advice as an opinion
without scientific basis.




asking a question like that to try and catch someone out

This not my intention, I ask that you give me the benefit of the doubt on this, and if you have no doubt on this
then nothing I say will ever change your view.



I think my 2 questions are interesting enough to me that I would like to find out the answers.
And I also found it it interesting that there appeared to be so little scientific data to ascertain
these answers.
Report TheBetterBettor March 22, 2021 4:41 AM GMT
You can get the flu twice so maybe you can contract the different varients of covid-19 more than once. With 98% survival rate however that could decrease with your ongoing age and the number times you do get it that's seriously symtomatic
Report BennyBinion1 March 22, 2021 7:57 AM GMT
Why have the vaccine, if you can still catch the virus and pass it on?

And if this is the case, why would you have a vaccine when no one can tell you if there are any long term affects?
Report PorcupineorPineapple March 22, 2021 9:35 AM GMT
I think the OP makes fair points. From what I can tell, getting the vaccine produces the same antibodies that you'd get from suffering the virus. I think there's a couple of reasons in favour of taking it. Firstly, you can't always be sure you've had it. I thought I had it round May last year. Wasn't very bad, just a day of high temp and a week of a tickly cough and then it went away. I got picked for the antibody test a couple of months ago and was negative. Similarly, my mate is convinced he had it. Was in a much worse state than me. He paid to get an antibody test for some work reasons and was again negative. Unless you're actually tested and confirmed as having it rather than just feeling crap for a week or two and presuming you've had it you can't be sure. Secondly, it's they Why Not? argument. Why not boost your immunity with the jab? Ignore the hysterics from the cowards desperately searching for something wrong, why not just do it and have that level of security? It seems certain we'll all be in for boosters as we approach winter, as we do for the flu, so just keep your antibody levels topped up.
Report sageform March 22, 2021 10:18 AM GMT
I have heard plenty of scientists say that catching the virus "naturally" will confer a variable level of antibodies for a variable period of time and a few people have no antibody at all. We may all need another dose in a years time including those who have had the disease. It is after all a close relative of influenza and that does not confer any lasting immunity.
Report BennyBinion1 March 22, 2021 12:24 PM GMT
Can anyone advise to any healthy human under the age of 60, who has to actually be tested positive to prove they have covid, if there are any long term effects 2 /5 /10 years down the line please?
Report PorcupineorPineapple March 22, 2021 12:40 PM GMT
Are you asking for proof of the 10-year effects of a disease that only came to existence 18 months ago?
Are you feeling ok?
Report BennyBinion1 March 22, 2021 1:27 PM GMT
Do you not understand the question?

Are there any long term effects for anyone taking the vaccine, 2/5/10 years down the line?

Cant say a simpler question than this.

Even you can understand.

Umm..well maybe not
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- March 22, 2021 1:32 PM GMT
Can you catch it twice


Some folk in Brazil are testing positive
to 2 strains at the same time.

Peer reviewed, maybe later, who knows
Report peckerdunne March 22, 2021 1:37 PM GMT
yes you can catch it twice, yes even after vaccination,and yes you can have two strains at once.

And yes we are not out of the woods at all

and yes we will see a 4th wave
Report sageform March 22, 2021 1:40 PM GMT
Benny how can anyone know the answer to whether a disease has 10 year effects when it has only existed for 18 months? Daft question. You might as well ask what the weather will be like on March 22 2031. There is new evidence that the vaccine reduces symptoms of those with long Covid but like so much of this, it will take years to finally understand it. We still understand very little about the common cold apart from that it is infectious.
Report PorcupineorPineapple March 22, 2021 2:10 PM GMT

Mar 22, 2021 -- 8:27AM, BennyBinion1 wrote:


Do you not understand the question?Are there any long term effects for anyone taking the vaccine, 2/5/10 years down the line?Cant say a simpler question than this.Even you can understand.Umm..well maybe not


Well you didn't actually mention vaccine in your question so apologies for my lapse in mind-reading.


My answer to this is always the same. Are there any long term side effects for anyone catching Covid, 2/5/10 years down the line?

We do know that there is long Covid, we do know that people who have suffered can take months to get their lungs back up to pre-Covid levels. There is disturbing information about Covid causing diabetes in some cases.


Can I ask you: What is your opinion on Covid? Are you in the camp of "it's harmless for the vast majority of people" or do you think we should do our utmost to avoid catching it, but also avoid vaccination, so - maybe - we lock down hard and long till its eradicated. If you are in the former camp, are you happy with the scientific evidence that it doesn't lead to long term complications?

Report DenzilPenberthy March 22, 2021 3:49 PM GMT

Mar 22, 2021 -- 8:32AM, ----you-have-to-laugh--- wrote:


Can you catch it twiceSome folk in Brazil are testing positiveto 2 strains at the same time.Peer reviewed, maybe later, who knows


Interesting - which test are they using to determine this please?

Report xmoneyx March 22, 2021 3:52 PM GMT
https://youtu.be/PbkInTnNQ28
Report TheBetterBettor March 22, 2021 11:57 PM GMT
BennyBinion122 Mar 21 13:24Joined: 07 Nov 08 | Topic/replies: 2,810 | Blogger: BennyBinion1's blog

Can anyone advise to any healthy human under the age of 60, who has to actually be tested positive to prove they have covid, if there are any long term effects 2 /5 /10 years down the line please?



I think BB1 concern is why is the pfizer/Moderna vaccine, that a has been tested 'n rolled within a space of a year since patient zero. Can not be liable in anyway shape or form if these injections end up giving you a crippling illness say in about 10/20/30 years down the line.
Report Giuseppe March 23, 2021 1:42 PM GMT
"Can you catch 'it' twice?"

generally speaking, you can't catch the same strain of a virus twice

if you get infected and recover, your body retains a memory of how to create the right antibodies

this is the norm for all viruses

if people are catching covid twice, it means it is a different strain, or perhaps the test was faulty (you can test positive months after being infected)

i would be amazed if there was evidence of people actually being sick more than once from the same strain
Report Giuseppe March 23, 2021 1:43 PM GMT
so no, it is not necessary to get vaccinated if you have been infected

vaccination may provide better protection than prior infection, but the difference is nothing major

a study in the uk a few months ago showed prior infection and vaccines had similar levels of protection
Report Giuseppe March 23, 2021 1:43 PM GMT
johnson etc are doing this for safety-first, we can't be sure, political reasons
Report Giuseppe March 23, 2021 1:47 PM GMT
"We do know that there is long Covid, we do know that people who have suffered can take months to get their lungs back up to pre-Covid levels. There is disturbing information about Covid causing diabetes in some cases."

long covid is BS amplified by the media to keep us from getting complacent

we are seldom provided with any hard numbers or context, or time spans

do they make eventual recoveries? how serious are their symptoms?

considering how many have been hospitalised, it is to be expected that some are still feeling poorly a few weeks later
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