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i_agree_with_nick
02 Oct 20 11:54
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Date Joined: 21 May 10
| Topic/replies: 12,544 | Blogger: i_agree_with_nick's blog
Why isn't it the vendor's responsibility to provide a surveyor's report?

If, as a buyer, you pull out due to a issues raised in the survey, you've lost money on the initial legal fees and have to pay for a survey on the next property.

Surely when buying a house, you want as much detail as possible.  I know some people don't bother with a survey at all but I've always found it odd how little time and research some people put in to buying a house.
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Report feedthepony October 2, 2020 10:56 AM BST
You need to move to Scotland lad - seller does it as a one time survey.  Called the home buyers report.

One of the few good things the Hollyrood Parish Council have actually done.

Now they just slaver on about an issue that is outside of their remit all day.
Report Petraco October 2, 2020 10:56 AM BST
I would imagine that the rule of Caveat Emptor takes precedence.  Mischief
Report politicspunter October 2, 2020 10:58 AM BST
I was about to say that there are different rules in each UK nation but feedthepony beat me to it.
Report i_agree_with_nick October 2, 2020 11:08 AM BST
You need to move to Scotland lad - seller does it as a one time survey.  Called the home buyers report.



I think the law in Scotland relating to property purchase in general makes the process smoother.  It certainly makes sense for the vendor to provide this information.

Why on earth don't we do this in England?
Report feedthepony October 2, 2020 11:20 AM BST
All depends on who the donors to the political parties are as to whether they do it in England.

I'd imagine the legal industry cover themselves nicely by giving a wedge to both sides.  In all likelihood they didn't foresee an SNP win during the Labour days so didn't bother making a contribution to them.  I'm sure that has now been sorted so the legal guys will get their policies passed in an SNP administration also going forward.

You get whatever the  donors of the party you elect want
Report Petraco October 2, 2020 11:21 AM BST
How cynical... Laugh
Report politicspunter October 2, 2020 11:25 AM BST
..and ludicrous.
Report dave1357 October 2, 2020 11:36 AM BST
https://www.theguardian.com/money/2010/may/20/home-information-packs-scrapped-hips

thank the tories
Report feedthepony October 2, 2020 11:44 AM BST
they were also dead against it in Scotland too if I recall - concerned about their banker mates having no confidence in the valuations from a lending perspective.
Report politicspunter October 2, 2020 11:48 AM BST
banker mates?
Report feedthepony October 2, 2020 11:56 AM BST
a subset of Conservative Party donors
Report i_agree_with_nick October 2, 2020 12:36 PM BST
I'm speaking through my pocket.  We had an offer accepted on a house. The surveyor's report has come back with some problems with the roof.  I think it can be fixed and may be covered by the NHBC guarantee (the house is only six years old!) but Mrs Nick is getting cold feet.
Report kevinglass October 2, 2020 1:16 PM BST
Of course the vendor could get a friendly surveyor to do the report if that's how it worked.....would you want to rely on that when you're spending hundreds of thousands?

Get a builder for a quote on the roof, and knock it off your offer price.

The NHBC claim would be torture, and unlikely to pay.
Report i_agree_with_nick October 2, 2020 1:23 PM BST
Thanks Kevin.

I intend to do exactly that.

I have heard that claiming against the NHBC guarantee could be a laborious process and ultimately unsuccessful.
Report breadnbutter October 2, 2020 2:12 PM BST
What is the issue with the roof?

Is it the construction, timber sizes, a strength issue or is it water ingres, ventilation, insulation......???

If its only six years old and the bits you can see are dodgy, then you must have a much closer look and suss out foundation type ect.

Who built it?
Report kevinglass October 2, 2020 2:30 PM BST
The NHBC certificate, whilst required for a mortgage on a new build, is very hard to claim against. I tried once. I failed once.

It only becomes a big deal for you really if you buy the house.

The vendors might be better off repairing it themselves, or every other potential buyer would be put off too of course.
Report i_agree_with_nick October 2, 2020 6:18 PM BST
breadnbutter 02 Oct 20 14:12

What is the issue with the roof?

Is it the construction, timber sizes, a strength issue or is it water ingres, ventilation, insulation......???

If its only six years old and the bits you can see are dodgy, then you must have a much closer look and suss out foundation type ect.

Who built it?



We couldn't see anything dodgy.  The issues were highlighted in our surveyor's report.


"The bedding mortar under the ridge tiles on the rear single storey roof is loose in places."

"Some daylight was noted within the roof space around the edges of the rear roof light...  Damp staining was also noted to the membrane surrounding the roof light which indicates the frame may have leaked slightly in the past.  The remaining roof covering appears in acceptable condition."

"The main roof space was entered through a hatch in the landing ceiling.  The roof is formed with modern roof trusses.    The    roof space is insulated    with modern fibreglass    quilt."

"As previously mentioned, daylight was noted around the    light tunnel and on the    front apex at the joint    of the fascia board. Damp staining was also noted around the    membrane adjacent to the light tunnel, indicating the area has possibly    leaked    in the    past. Localised    repairs    may be required."

"The roof structure is in satisfactory order. The roof insulation is also adequate. Roof timbers should    be regularly inspected and maintained in good condition."
Report lfc1971 October 2, 2020 6:24 PM BST
Rules for house buying , selling in Scotland are the worst of all 4 home nations
Report lfc1971 October 2, 2020 6:39 PM BST
Don’t like the idea of sealed bids eg . Suppose there must be some reason for it .
Report Angoose October 2, 2020 6:45 PM BST
That's right, you're not a fan of equitable processes, aren't you.
Report lapsy pa October 2, 2020 6:48 PM BST
I know the stamp duty is done away with for a while but seems to be a lot of "for sale" signs just lately?
Report Angoose October 2, 2020 6:49 PM BST
Everything is for sale in this crazy world Sad
Report lfc1971 October 2, 2020 6:51 PM BST
Too much like guesswork angoose , prefer to know the offers made on the property
Report lfc1971 October 2, 2020 6:54 PM BST
Oh I see , forgot you were Scottish .
Report lapsy pa October 2, 2020 6:56 PM BST
Yes,it is a "crazy world" , i know a lot of selling got defered by lockdown, but it looks as if others are bailing out at near high?
I always wonder where they go,house swapping,up/downsizing,i haven't seen so many signs for a few years.
Report lfc1971 October 2, 2020 7:05 PM BST
Seems like madness for house prices to be rising now
But then I’ve been expecting price fall for about 10 years
Report lapsy pa October 2, 2020 7:08 PM BST
You must be off your chuck if you are a 1st time buyer lfc.
Report lfc1971 October 2, 2020 7:13 PM BST
Yes, having said that houses are still affordable in large parts of the country even for young people.
But it all seems so much more risky now . Maybe I’m getting old and don’t like risk now Happy
Report lfc1971 October 2, 2020 7:24 PM BST
Hard to understand when a lot of people don’t know if they will have a job in a few months time
Report lapsy pa October 2, 2020 7:27 PM BST
Indeed Lfc,in a falling house market would renters still be expected to pay top whack?
Could imagine landlords trying that on.
Report lfc1971 October 2, 2020 7:33 PM BST
That’s what happens , or at least has done in the past . And I think it always does
That’s what stopped many landlords going bust in the past , they could wait
If they had to sell they would lose a fortune
Report lfc1971 October 2, 2020 7:38 PM BST
Ideally for the most peace of mind 2 properties are ideal One to live in . And one empty
Forget about letting it .
That’s all .
Report lfc1971 October 2, 2020 7:44 PM BST
I always remember reading about an elderly lady in France
She had lived in Paris when young and when the Germans invaded in WW2 she went to live in the south of France
The flat in Paris lay empty until she died 70 years later , she rarely or never went back but the property was still there in Paris
That appealed to me somehow
Report Dr Crippen October 2, 2020 8:11 PM BST
If the buyer would be happy with a survey commissioned by the vendor, I'd be surprised if the lender would.
Report Dr Crippen October 2, 2020 8:17 PM BST
Indeed Lfc,in a falling house market would renters still be expected to pay top whack?

And more.

In a falling market, mortgages are withdrawn, houses aren't being built and the competition to rent a property increases.
Report lapsy pa October 2, 2020 8:24 PM BST
Don't doubt you Dr C., however i am under an impression that brown/greenfield sites are being used in some areas(due in part to covid) in new house building,i read it a few weeks ago,i stand to be corrected but i believe they are being pushed through particulary in SE?
Report rock piper October 3, 2020 8:07 PM BST
That sounds like a handy enough repair, get a friendly chippy/bricklayer/roofer to have a look and ask them to knock a grand off.
Report JML October 4, 2020 4:33 AM BST
I agree with nick---

Under Part 5 of the Housing Act 2004 a Home Information Pack (HIP, on lowercase letters: hip), sometimes called a Seller's Pack, was to be provided before a property in England and Wales could be put on the open market for sale with vacant possession. There is separate legislation for Scotland that requires anyone selling a property to provide a Home Report. The pack was a set of documents about the property: an Energy Performance Certificate, local authority searches, title documents, guarantees, etc. The introduction of HIPs was subject to delays and reduced requirements, but they became mandatory for homes with four or more bedrooms on 1 August 2007 and were extended to three-bedroomed properties from 10 September 2007.

The Government had suggested that Home Information Packs would lead to a reduction in the number of abortive sales as their justification for introducing the scheme, reducing gazumping and gazundering. They were introduced despite very strong opposition from some factions in the building industry (although very many were in favour of them) and estate agents, as well as some chartered surveyors. There were claims that the packs contributed to the 2007-09 housing crisis by deterring vendors from marketing their houses due to the extra costs involved in the survey.

Requirement for the Home Information Pack for property sales was suspended with effect from 21 May 2010 by the incoming government. An exception is that the Energy Performance Certificate is still required. The Localism Act 2011 formally repealed the Home Information Pack legislation on 15 January 2012.
Report Dr Crippen October 4, 2020 11:31 AM BST
Another reason for withdrawing HIPs is the one I gave.

Why should the lender trust a survey that someone else has commissioned?

The lender will still do their own survey for valuation purposes.

And why should the buyer trust the seller's survey?

The labour government were told this from the start, but still pushed it through. Which is good example of the idiots who govern us. And the mess they make when they interfere.
Report Dr Crippen October 4, 2020 11:38 AM BST
The current government are busy wrecking the renting market at the moment.
This comes from listening to people who don't know what they're talking about.
And ignoring those who do.
Report i_agree_with_nick October 4, 2020 11:45 AM BST
The vendor is a nationwide house builder. The previous owner occupier has bought a new build so the builder purchased his house to speed up the transaction.

Presumably they would have done their own survey and would have been aware of the issues with the roof.
Report Dr Crippen October 4, 2020 12:14 PM BST
The vendor would do a survey for valuation.
Report i_agree_with_nick October 9, 2020 3:29 PM BST
Getting insured hasn't been easy.  So many firms have said they can't cover the property due to flood risk!

There is no risk from river flooding and risk from surface water is very low.

It must be very difficult or very expensive if you have a real risk of flood.
Report i_agree_with_nick October 10, 2020 2:02 PM BST
I once lived in a first floor flat which I sold and moved to one on the second floor.

But that's another storey.
Report Petraco October 10, 2020 2:08 PM BST
Laugh
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