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InsiderTrader
24 Sep 19 14:57
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Date Joined: 25 Aug 05
| Topic/replies: 14,569 | Blogger: InsiderTrader's blog
Tom Watson has stepped aside so that Corbyn can speak today so MPs can be back in parliament tomorrow.

Will be interesting to see if any new policies come up.

So far:

1. Brexit. Do a deal with the EU to stay in a customs union and close to the single market. Then offer a referendum to people on that or remain. They will decide after an election if they support their own deal.

2. Housing. build 1,000,000 new homes.

3. Social care: free for all over 65s? Not 100% sure on that.

4. Abolish private schools and put their assets into state schools.

5. A living wage of at least £10 an hour.

6. 10% of companies to be owned by the workers (any payments from this over £500 a year to go into fund to help the whole of society).

7. Reduce working week to 32 hours.

8. Free leisure and cultural experiences for all.

Anything else for the many not the few?
Pause Switch to Standard View CORBYN's speech moved to 4pm TODAY
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Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:01 PM BST
prescriptions
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:02 PM BST
social care free for those that need it
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:02 PM BST
national care service
Report Angoose September 24, 2019 5:02 PM BST
There's a few on here who would greatly benefit from that
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:02 PM BST
national education service
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:02 PM BST
national education service for life? Is this free uni fees for masters and phds?
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:03 PM BST
raise taxes for top 5%.
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:03 PM BST
scrap tuition fees

restart surestart

free training for adults


tax rises for top 5%
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:05 PM BST
no need for adults to skip meals to feed kids

14 million in uk living in poverty, a shame as highlighted by united nations


caused by harsh and uncaring ethos ( the tories)
Report Angoose September 24, 2019 5:05 PM BST
Tories : Harsh and uncaring ethos
Sounds about right.Sad
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:05 PM BST
Revive the high street
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:05 PM BST
kickstart highstreets
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:06 PM BST
How?
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:06 PM BST
destroyed by tory austerity and local government funding cuts
Report sewter lives again September 24, 2019 5:07 PM BST
has he said how much all thus will cost?
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:07 PM BST
Not yet. Probably will at the end?
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:07 PM BST
upgrade broadband, transport

creating investment and jobs

no more tory tinkering around the edges
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:08 PM BST
a crossrail for the north linking our cities

liverpool to hull, to newcastle in north east
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:08 PM BST
Restore bus services
Report Angoose September 24, 2019 5:08 PM BST
Boris will invest in busty American dizzy blondes Shocked
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:08 PM BST
bus services restored
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:10 PM BST
Climate emergency. Take on wealth hoarders.
Report Movewiththetimes September 24, 2019 5:10 PM BST
Is his moneytree planted in uk or Europe
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:10 PM BST
Green industrial revolution
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:11 PM BST
100s of thousands of high paid unionised jobs
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:11 PM BST
climate matters

take on polluters

nett zero emissions

not a burden but an opportunity

100s of thousands of good jobs
Report dambuster September 24, 2019 5:11 PM BST
DIANE ABBOT HAS DONE THE SUMS AND ALL OF THIS WILL COST APPROX 30 BOB, give or take a few pennies
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:11 PM BST
bolsunaro fiddles whilst rain forest burns
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:12 PM BST
human rights and justice

not foreign wars that fuel terrorism
Report Injera September 24, 2019 5:12 PM BST
I'm voting Labour. Everything's free!!!
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:13 PM BST
It seems if you are not in the top 5% you pay no more tax but get a lot of offerings.
Report anxious September 24, 2019 5:13 PM BST
Viva Jeremiah CoolCoolCool
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:13 PM BST
johnson appeasing trump in america

spreading conflict not settling them

must not make same mistakes again

britain will be a force for peace
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:14 PM BST
Having another go at Boris Johnson.
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:14 PM BST
Stick to policy please.
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:14 PM BST
racism, islamaphobia and antisemitism a sign of weakness
Report Angoose September 24, 2019 5:15 PM BST
Must be near the end, start and end with Tory attack
Report anxious September 24, 2019 5:15 PM BST
Jeremy will destroy Bulingdon in an election campaign
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:16 PM BST
tories blame everybody but themselves

labour will bring people together

not for the 52% or 48% but for the 99% ...



applause
Report Movewiththetimes September 24, 2019 5:16 PM BST
Nothing on brexit Cry
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:17 PM BST
when labour wins we all win

nurses students pensioners



not those those with friends in high places
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:17 PM BST
He complains at blaming other like migrants for your problems. Which is right. Then he blames speculators and bankers for your problems. Isn't that just as divisive?
Report n88uk September 24, 2019 5:17 PM BST

Sep 24, 2019 -- 11:16AM, Movewiththetimes wrote:


Nothing on brexit


He started with Brexit.

Report anxious September 24, 2019 5:18 PM BST
Stick that where the sun dont shine bulingdon , cummings , farage etc
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:18 PM BST
Anxious be positive rather than blaming others for the problems in society.
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:18 PM BST
you learn from people when you listen to them


thanks family for freely given advice

apologises for intrusions into their life from gutter press and other media
Report anxious September 24, 2019 5:20 PM BST
Positive about what austerity and trickle down Plain
Report Movewiththetimes September 24, 2019 5:20 PM BST
n88uk24 Sep 19 17:17Joined: 26 May 12 | Topic/replies: 178,894 | Blogger: n88uk's blog
Sep 24, 2019 -- 5:16PM, Movewiththetimes wrote:

Nothing on brexit


He started with Brexit.


I missed his position, will he be campaigning for leave or remain?
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:20 PM BST
thanks locals for local campaigns

laura who force rogue landlord to remove damp
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:20 PM BST
Movewiththetimes he will get a deal then the people will decide that deal or remain.
Report Movewiththetimes September 24, 2019 5:21 PM BST
Oh right so nothing on brexit
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:22 PM BST
will be proud to be prime minister

but will be different

not with entitlement or on power trip

wants to put power and wealth into ppeoples hands
Report invicta September 24, 2019 5:22 PM BST
meanwhile behind the scenes officials are working tirelessly to get the excuses ready as to why they cannot deliver on the promises, again.
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:23 PM BST
build a country fit for next generation free from fear of debt and mental health

with support of community on their life journey



we can take on privledge

go forward and win election for the people of this country
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:23 PM BST
wow. Great speech Jeremy.
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:24 PM BST
Odds after speak. Most seats 4.6 (from 4.7). Majority 15.0 (from 15.0)
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:25 PM BST
good speech

very aspirational , and inspirational

who wouldnt want to live in corbyns version of britain

Love
Report InsiderTrader September 24, 2019 5:25 PM BST
New policy was the generic drugs
Report Movewiththetimes September 24, 2019 5:25 PM BST
So in a nutshell I should buy all the combos for tonight's £177 million euro lottery and sort out the sums later CryCryCry
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 24, 2019 5:27 PM BST
i suppose they could borrow as much as the tories have
Report Esox September 24, 2019 5:51 PM BST
Would love to see a proper Labour government in my lifetime and soon.
Labour wins we all win.
Report sofiakenny September 24, 2019 5:54 PM BST
These tory filth have been pissing on us (its raining)for far too long..the times they are a changing.
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 25, 2019 9:28 AM BST
the lack of abuse tells me this was a great speech by jeremy corbyn

very much under reported on a day when bj was shown up,
trumpy made a dreadful speech, found himself in danger of impeachment
and generalissimo franco was put in danger of being dug up.
Report Movewiththetimes September 25, 2019 9:30 AM BST
Your username is apt
Report thegiggilo September 25, 2019 9:36 AM BST
It was brilliant,zero coverage unbelievable there's no one else that couldv'e made that speech yesterday it's worth watching/listening too as in recent times was amazed how good it was,even on twitter the nutters were inexplicably missing.Compare it to jo swinsons,which wasn't even in the same universe,his was all from the heart and sounded sincere but they won't get any benefit from it as no coverage..Any younger voters floating between libs and labour there wouldbv'e been no contest if they watched that shouldv'e been a massive vote winner amongst the young,bad timing for viewing on the good old BBC  news.
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 25, 2019 9:43 AM BST
the speech was one of his best,

nobody will really want to debate him again when the election does come

bj will hide,
Report TheGoldenVision September 25, 2019 10:11 AM BST
Labour is a democratic party that trusts the people. 

Deliver on the referendum then.


Thats not complicated
Report Dr Crippen September 25, 2019 10:17 AM BST
4. Abolish private schools and put their assets into state schools.

That's sure to attract a challenge in the courts now the Supreme Court has decided to intervene in Parliamentary matters.

And what about the rest of Corbyn's radical policies?
Report InsiderTrader September 25, 2019 10:29 AM BST
If you have a majority in parliament cannot you just put in laws to seize private assets? Or tax private assets at 1000% until they are collected as debt for failure to pay tax.

It could just mean more many for clever accountants and lawyers. Especially if there is a lot of government money pouring into public works, green tech and pharma.
Report Dr Crippen September 25, 2019 11:32 AM BST
Now that a new precedent has been set by the Supreme Court, they can intervene and throw out any legislation they choose.
What is to stop them?
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 25, 2019 11:33 AM BST
did you read the verdict crippen

clearly not
Report Dr Crippen September 25, 2019 11:39 AM BST
Explain it then laugh, instead of giving the impression that you know more than everyone else when you obviously do not.
Report politicspunter September 25, 2019 11:49 AM BST

Sep 25, 2019 -- 5:39AM, Dr Crippen wrote:


Explain it then laugh, instead of giving the impression that you know more than everyone else when you obviously do not.


He clearly knows more than you. He is able to read for a start.

Report Dr Crippen September 25, 2019 11:59 AM BST
You explain it then little pp.

Nobody knows more about politics than you do - and you've got the losing betting slips to prove it. Lol.
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 25, 2019 12:37 PM BST
the full verdict has been linked to forum before but once again

https://www.supremecourt.uk/cases/docs/uksc-2019-0192-judgment.pdf


if you read it and then struggle to understand we can try to help you through understanding
how the verdict was reached. obviously you may still disagree with it, or indeed you may
find it makes perfect sense, or somewhere between.
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 25, 2019 12:50 PM BST
section 41 ..

Two fundamental principles of our constitutional law are relevant to the present case. The first is the principle of Parliamentary sovereignty: that laws enacted by the Crown in Parliament are the supreme form of law in our legal system, with which everyone, including the Government, must comply. However, the effect which the courts have given to Parliamentary sovereignty is not confined to recognising the status of the legislation enacted by the Crown in Parliament as our highest form of law. Time and again, in a series of cases since the 17th century, the courts have protected Parliamentary sovereignty from threats posed to it by the use of prerogative powers, and in doing so have demonstrated that prerogative powers are limited by the principle of Parliamentary sovereignty. To give only a few examples, in the Case of Proclamations the court protected Parliamentary sovereignty directly, by holding that prerogative powers could not be used to alter the law of the land. Three centuries later, in the case of Attorney General v De Keyser’s Royal Hotel Ltd [1920] AC 508, the court prevented the Government of the day from seeking by indirect means to bypass Parliament, in circumventing a statute through the use of the prerogative. More recently, in the Fire Brigades Union case, the court again prevented the Government from rendering a statute nugatory through recourse to the prerogative, and was not deflected by the fact that the Government had failed to bring the statute into effect. As Lord Browne-Wilkinson observed in that case at p 552, “the constitutional history of this country is the history of the prerogative powers of the Crown being made subject to the overriding powers of the democratically elected legislature as the sovereign body”.
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 25, 2019 12:52 PM BST
42

The sovereignty of Parliament would, however, be undermined as the foundational principle of our constitution if the executive could, through the use of the prerogative, prevent Parliament from exercising its legislative authority for as long as it pleased. That, however, would be the position if there was no legal limit upon the power to prorogue Parliament (subject to a few exceptional circumstances in which, under statute, Parliament can meet while it stands prorogued). An unlimited power of prorogation would therefore be incompatible with the legal principle of Parliamentary sovereignty.
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 25, 2019 12:53 PM BST
48

That principle is not placed in jeopardy if Parliament stands prorogued for the short period which is customary, and as we have explained, Parliament does not in any event expect to be in permanent session. But the longer that Parliament stands prorogued, the greater the risk that responsible government may be replaced by unaccountable government: the antithesis of the democratic model. So the same question arises as in relation to Parliamentary sovereignty: what is the legal limit upon the power to prorogue which makes it compatible with the ability of Parliament to carry out its constitutional functions?
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 25, 2019 12:55 PM BST
49, 50

In answering that question, it is of some assistance to consider how the courts have dealt with situations where the exercise of a power conferred by statute, rather than one arising under the prerogative, was liable to affect the operation of a constitutional principle. The approach which they have adopted has concentrated on the effect of the exercise of the power upon the operation of the relevant constitutional principle. Unless the terms of the statute indicate a contrary intention, the courts have set a limit to the lawful exercise of the power by holding that the extent to which the measure impedes or frustrates the operation of the relevant principle must have a reasonable justification. That approach can be seen, for example, in R (UNISON) v Lord Chancellor [2017] UKSC 51; [2017] 3 WLR 409, paras 80-82 and 88-89, where earlier authorities were discussed. A prerogative power is, of course, different from a statutory power: since it is not derived from statute, its limitations cannot be derived from a process of statutory interpretation. However, a prerogative power is only effective to the extent that it is recognised by the common law: as was said in the Case of Proclamations, “the King hath no prerogative, but that which the law of the land allows him”. A prerogative power is therefore limited by statute and the common law, including, in the present context, the constitutional principles with which it would otherwise conflict.

50. For the purposes of the present case, therefore, the relevant limit upon the power to prorogue can be expressed in this way: that a decision to prorogue Parliament (or to advise the monarch to prorogue Parliament) will be unlawful if the prorogation has the effect of frustrating or preventing, without reasonable justification, the ability of Parliament to carry out its constitutional functions as a legislature and as the body responsible for the supervision of the executive. In such a situation, the court will intervene if the effect is sufficiently serious to justify such an exceptional course.
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 25, 2019 12:57 PM BST
51

That standard is one that can be applied in practice. The extent to which prorogation frustrates or prevents Parliament’s ability to perform its legislative functions and its supervision of the executive is a question of fact which presents no greater difficulty than many other questions of fact which are routinely decided by the courts. The court then has to decide whether the Prime Minister’s explanation for advising that Parliament should be prorogued is a reasonable justification for a prorogation having those effects. The Prime Minister’s wish to end one session of Parliament and to begin another will normally be enough in itself to justify the short period of prorogation which has been normal in modern practice. It could only be in unusual circumstances that any further justification might be necessary. Even in such a case, when considering the justification put forward, the court would have to bear in mind that the decision whether to advise the monarch to prorogue Parliament falls within the area of responsibility of the Prime Minister, and that it may in some circumstances involve a range of considerations, including matters of political judgment. The court would therefore have to consider any justification that might be advanced with sensitivity to the responsibilities and experience of the Prime Minister, and with a corresponding degree of caution. Nevertheless, it is the court’s responsibility to determine whether the Prime Minster has remained within the legal limits of the power. If not, the final question will be whether the consequences are sufficiently serious to call for the court’s intervention.
Report Dr Crippen September 25, 2019 12:59 PM BST
I'll put it simply, so that even someone like laugh can understand.

The Supreme court can make any judgement they choose. They can declare any act as unlawful if they see fit.

There is no higher authority that can challenge their decisions except the European court.

Yesterday's decision was conformation that they will act and change decisions made by governments.
Even if it's written in law, they have the authority to interpret that law as they see fit.
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 25, 2019 12:59 PM BST
61

It is impossible for us to conclude, on the evidence which has been put before us, that there was any reason - let alone a good reason - to advise Her Majesty to prorogue Parliament for five weeks, from 9th or 12th September until 14th October. We cannot speculate, in the absence of further evidence, upon what such reasons might have been. It follows that the decision was unlawful
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 25, 2019 1:00 PM BST
no they cannot change government laws legally passed by parliament
Report Dr Crippen September 25, 2019 1:02 PM BST
All that tripe above from laugh is completely missing the point.
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 25, 2019 1:02 PM BST
they can stop government acting illegally.


parliament can go change law to make prorogation legal, if it has a majority agree to it

the cort cannot challenge that
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 25, 2019 1:03 PM BST
court
Report Dr Crippen September 25, 2019 1:18 PM BST
they can stop government acting illegally.

Exactly, but they have the power to decide what is legal and what is illegal.
And their rulings cannot be challenged.

That's the point.
Report politicspunter September 25, 2019 1:20 PM BST
You could try the European Court?
Report Dr Crippen September 25, 2019 1:27 PM BST
Dr Crippen
25 Sep 19 12:59

There is no higher authority that can challenge their decisions except the European court.
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 25, 2019 1:28 PM BST
the supreme court can not overturn any primary law passed by parliament.


it can declare a law to be in breach of human rights, it is then up to
government to alter law or to carry on regardless whilst in breach.
Report Dr Crippen September 25, 2019 1:29 PM BST
It would be funny if this government took any ruling to the EU court.
Report Dr Crippen September 25, 2019 1:37 PM BST
The question here was whether the Supreme Court would agree with the High Court and keep out of Parliamentary affairs.

Once they decided the workings of Parliament is their business then the government was in trouble.

They've opened a can of worms.

The ruling doesn't change much in this case, but any future challenges to the government of any code  could have far reaching effects to limit their powers.
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 25, 2019 1:38 PM BST
who have not understood the ruling
Report InsiderTrader September 25, 2019 2:40 PM BST
Parliament can pass a law but this parliament will not.

There are too many Tory MPs who were voted in saying they would allow 'no deal' who changed their minds.

We need an election to get rid of them. Without the Tory label what chance have people like Soubry got?
Report Angoose September 25, 2019 2:45 PM BST
Parliamentary affairs cease to be purely parliamentary affairs when the underlying motive of these affairs seek to breach constitutional boundaries.
A concept that Geoffrey Cox fully understands and is duty bound to explain and enforce within government.
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 25, 2019 8:53 PM BST
still the best speech this week

please search for corbyn at labour party conference to see why you should vote
corbyn at next election.
Report politicspunter September 25, 2019 8:56 PM BST
You are using krushers axe template!
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 25, 2019 8:57 PM BST
Laugh
Report ----you-have-to-laugh--- September 25, 2019 8:58 PM BST
trying to flush him out

not see him about this week
Report politicspunter September 25, 2019 9:04 PM BST
He is using the name eric this week.
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