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Uberalles
23 May 18 20:10
Joined:
Date Joined: 23 Nov 02
| Topic/replies: 9,337 | Blogger: Uberalles's blog
Have been laying him for a while and price keeps getting shorter!!

9/2 currently seems ridiculous. With his out of touch views on many subjects, don't think even the 1922 committee would touch him despite there being few candidates
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Report donny osmond May 27, 2018 10:27 AM BST
CONSERVATIVE hardline Brexiteer Jacob Rees-Mogg has argued Ruth Davidson should not be allowed to marry her female partner.

Interviewed yesterday, the high-profile backbencher praised the Scottish Tory leader as a “formidable person with great political skills”. He was then asked: “But you wouldn’t support her marriage to the woman she wants to marry?”

Rees-Mogg replied: “This is a sacramental issue. The sacrament of marriage is one that is defined by the church, not by the state, and the sacrament of marriage is available to a man and a woman. And this is the teaching of the Catholic Church which I accept.”
Report PorcupineorPineapple May 27, 2018 10:38 AM BST
So...the church says no so I'm blindly agreeing with it because I just follow whatever the church tells me to do, say and believe. No need to consider it, debate it and then come to a decision. Just do what that bloke in a frock tells me to do.



Just don't get these religious whackjobs.
Report Foinavon May 27, 2018 10:57 AM BST
He didn't say she shouldn't be allowed to marry whomever she chooses, he said he accepts the Catholic church's definition of marriage.
Religion is a personal thing and people believe all sorts of bizarre ideas as a result.
Report donny osmond May 27, 2018 11:36 AM BST
thats not what he said foinavon

the quotes are above, its clear
Report Foinavon May 27, 2018 4:08 PM BST
He's talking about the sacrament of marriage as defined by the Catholic church, the state defines marriage differently.
He doesn't recognise the definition of marriage according to the state, that's his problem. He is not denying that she can have a ceremony as defined by the state and even some progressive churches, just that he doesn't recognise it as marriage. I and many others do.
Report Uberalles May 27, 2018 4:22 PM BST
Interesting thoughts here guys.

Ok, who should be favourite?
Report enpassant May 27, 2018 7:20 PM BST
He says he doesn't want to be PM.
Report Foinavon May 27, 2018 7:50 PM BST
They all say that. I hope he doesn't become Tory leader as I don't think he's electable in this day and age, Boris has more appeal but is marmite. Hard to know who has the most sway within the party, I suspect it's Gove. The man I would like to see come to the fore is Raab although he needs to build more cabinet experience so maybe too soon for him.
The dark horse is of course Javid, no pun intended.

If I was having a punt it would be Gove.
Report enpassant May 27, 2018 8:07 PM BST
I'm sure the devout millionaire JRM wouldn't say something knowingly misleading.
Report Foinavon May 27, 2018 8:12 PM BST
That's reassuring enpassant, I hope you are right.
Report akabula May 27, 2018 8:24 PM BST
As a leader David Cameron was head and shoulders above anyone currently in politics.
If he had remained (no pun intended) we wouldn't be in the turmoil we are in.
Report donny osmond May 27, 2018 8:59 PM BST
it seems to be ordained that may will stand down and gove will take over up
to the next election.

raab speaks well, and isnt too close to all the antics so may benefit long term.
Report PorcupineorPineapple May 27, 2018 9:47 PM BST
Cameron will go down in history as the worst PM since Chamberlain


Luckily for him it looks like May is surpassing him already.
Report Foinavon May 28, 2018 12:26 AM BST
Don't you mean since Blair?
Report jed.davison May 28, 2018 10:55 AM BST
I think you'll find that how History views Cameron will be decided by the people who write it.

The way it's going, Cameron will be viewed as a hero, because he gave the people of this country a chance to vote on an existential issue when nobody else would, and because in the end we will see off the Fifth Columnist Remainers.
Report Foinavon May 28, 2018 12:05 PM BST
I feel that way too, Jed although his motives may have been dubious. It makes up for having reneged on his Lisbon treaty pledge.
Report melv May 28, 2018 9:24 PM BST
because in the end we will see off the Fifth Columnist Remainers. oh dear Jed Jed jed Jed. When will you fantasists ever wake up and remember that you lot voted for this. Its all your fault. We voted against this disaster being allowed to happen. We were aware of the dangers but its even worse than we feared. I never thought the entire establishment might go insane. Do quit being the eternal victims.


As for me its now "Back stop Brexit" which means we will keep the current arrangements and will  argue leaving amongst ourselves and negotiate with Europe ……for ever.... LaughLaughLaughLaughLaughLaugh

Hope your proud of yourselves and  you pointless little vote. Or do you really think your fantasy land will magically appear anytime within the next decade.
Report Foinavon May 28, 2018 9:29 PM BST
So you have put your faith in Treason May then Melv, who would have thought it.
Report treetop May 29, 2018 10:04 PM BST
May's saving grace is that she believed in democracy and understands how important it is that our representatives in Parliament (joke ?) adhere to the will of the people as expressed in the referendum. Sneer and deride that concept as much as you like but ignoring that will have a very bad impact on UK in general.
Report donny osmond May 30, 2018 12:23 AM BST
rees mogg doesnt seem to think she is , ....


we shall see
Report jed.davison May 30, 2018 10:02 AM BST
Melv what does that hysterical tirade actually mean? You did vote against it, but do try to remember - you lost that vote. Despite Project Fear and all its lies, the people of England voted overwhelmingly to leave the EU. We didn't vote for a decade-long period of further entanglement and subjection to EU writ, we voted to leave, I'm sure in most cases without undue delay.

Do quite being the eternal victims? Of what melv? We were asked our opinion, we gave it, and in accordance with the spirit of British democracy, we are now waiting for our wishes to be enacted.

And now melv, we come back to the point I have argued with you several times before, but I will point it out to you again one more time as you appear a little unwilling to accept the reality.

Mrs May is a Conservative Prime Minister, and apart from isolated enclaves in the other Nations of the United Kingdom, her constituency is England. If she delivers no Brexit, or a Brexit which fails to address the issues which cause the Leave vote, she will kill off the Conservative Party for ever. This is not fantasy, this is realpolitik. The only fantasy here is yours - namely that Mrs May will commit electoral suicide in order to appease a largely Labour and Liberal Democrat constituency that wishes we had not voted Leave and now seeks to do anything in its power to prevent our departure.

It can't happen melv - soft Brexit, back-stop Brexit, any of it. Brexit will be hard. And all your bleating will come to nothing.
Report Esox May 30, 2018 12:27 PM BST
George Soros I hope you know him, says Brexit will be very damaging and another referendum should be held.
Report cyclops May 30, 2018 12:34 PM BST
jed, as a Remainer, I was disappointed to lose but that's the way life goes. We all have to accept defeat. I had no thoughts of how or whether the vote could be stopped. My feeling was "I hope it's better than I think and I was wrong" because I have four kids whose lives I hope will take place in a successful country.

But my point now is that we've blown it already. Two years after the vote and the cabinet has still not decided what they want and, whatever their eventual conclusion, there is not enough time to do the work required.
Protracted "entanglement" is now inevitable (if the EU will allow it). We have all been failed already by those entrusted with enacting the referendum decision.

Spool back two years and tell those who voted Leave that we would be in this position and everyone would have laughed at you. Leavers have been let down by a government who will not govern and an opposition who will not oppose. We have arrived at Groundhog day, the system in palsy. It is not the fault of the EU, nor is the fault of Remainers.

"We are waiting for our wishes to be enacted". Are you not bored/frustrated/disillusioned that whichever of the multifarious Brexit wishes it was that you voted for cannot now happen and that the sunlit uplands are no longer even being spoken about, let alone believed in, other than by certified cranks and the billionaire owners of the right wing press?
Report jed.davison May 30, 2018 1:14 PM BST
No I am not any of those things my monocular friend, because in the end, as I said above, we will have our Brexit, and it will be the way I have always wanted it to be - hard and unfriendly.

And longer term I'm not worried anyway, because the EU, and its greatest folly the Euro, are doomed.
Report mafeking May 30, 2018 1:52 PM BST
jed, your previous post is utter commonsense particularly concerning the prospect of further tory electoral success being tied into a brexit the majority of leavers voted for.

however it seems to have escaped a majority of the cabinet and plenty of tory MPs. surely the first thing any politician puts at the top of the list is self preservation
Report cyclops May 30, 2018 2:44 PM BST
In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is King.

"We will have our Brexit". Not at all sure you will.
Report cyclops May 30, 2018 2:48 PM BST
Why do you think May will get through your "hard and unfriendly Brexit" when she's spent the past two years trying to avoid just that for fear of her party disintegrating.

If she goes hard, it crumbles, if she goes soft, it crumbles as far as I can see. That's why she's frozen into prolonged denial and why she's ruining any sort of Brexit at all. (Thank God).
Report jed.davison May 30, 2018 2:55 PM BST
She will do what is right for the Tory Party, and unfortunately for you and the anti-democrats on the Tory benches, that will ultimately mean she has to yield to the Brexiteers.
Report cyclops May 30, 2018 2:58 PM BST
The maths suggest otherwise
Report jed.davison May 30, 2018 3:18 PM BST
We shall see - the maths looks good for them now maybe, but they haven't been asked to vote against the Government when doing so will cause an election.
Report moisok May 31, 2018 8:40 PM BST
Do any countries outside of the Eu survive at all?
Report treetop June 3, 2018 5:32 PM BST
The Sunday Times is full of gloom today apparently running out of petrol in Scotland, the north and Cornwall after a fortnight ! Project Fear all over again,when will they ever learn ? I do believe some clowns will actively sabotage our system by bureaucratic obstruction in Dover to have the joys of being proved right.
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 10:50 AM BST
Few would argue that most of the economic signs are now negative for the Uk as Brexit nears.
Some clearly believe that an exit is worth that pain and they are entitled to that opinion.
But to cry "Project Fear" whenever evidence surfaces, rather than putting forward a coherent argument echoes Trump's "Fake News" cry whenever there are inconvenient facts.
Argue your case, by all means, but looking for new demons to attack (is it the Civil Service who are the "clowns"? Sabotaging Remainers?)in order to justify the developing mess just continues the scapegoating that Brexiteers are increasingly turning to in the absence of the pre-referendum targets.
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 11:20 AM BST
But to cry "Project Fear" whenever evidence surfaces

The prediction of fuel shortages hardly constitutes evidence, in much the same way as the prediction of snap budgets, plagues and pestilence and the sky falling in before the vote were not evidence of anything except the stupidity of those who believed them.
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 11:45 AM BST
There is no question that both sides traded on falsehoods. But that shouldn't mean that people put their fingers in their ears and refuse to believe anything that contradicts the way they voted.

When HMRC estimates that one of the preferred customs arrangements will cost UK business £20 billion, for example, this is lumped into the "Project Fear" category by many, rather than the astonishing claim being examined in any detail.

Looking back at your earlier post,your claim that May "will do what is right for the Tory party" says it all. (Not that I believe there is anything that can be done to placate that lot). Most of us would prefer if she did what's right for the country.
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 11:59 AM BST
Well of course, we'd also prefer it if the sun shone every day and little rabbits didn't get run over by cars, but there you go.

And it also depends on how you define and measure what is right for the country? I'm guessing that we would have differing interpretations of that.
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 12:03 PM BST
I'm sure we would.

A question on the above HMRC estimate.

Do you:

1) Ignore it.
2) Think it's part of Project fear.
3) Think anything's worth the price of leaving the EU.
4) Something else.
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 12:25 PM BST
I'd regard it as a couple of years of our contributions to the EU and thus no real biggie, or maybe one and a half times the annual foreign aid budget.

It is of course part of Project Fear, which still continues despite being long ago proven to be composed entirely of falsehoods.

And yes, any price is worth paying to execute the democratically-expressed wishes of the people of England.
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 12:39 PM BST
"any price is worth paying to execute the democratically-expressed wishes of the people of England".

So different from what Brexiteers promised..................

(And so different from what so many of those who voted Leave voted for - many of them were not idealogues).

So, HMRC are part of Project Fear now?

And you flippantly describe 20 billion per annum as "no real biggie". What would a "real biggie" be? We pay 8.6 billion per annum to the EU (on 2015 figures - the most recent I can find) so you think a sum more than double that as an annual business cost is acceptable?

I don't think that approach stands up to much examination. But that's probably the point.
Report lfc1971 June 4, 2018 12:51 PM BST
who are we paying the £20 billion to?
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 12:58 PM BST
Exactly lfc, it is the imagined cost to the nebulous idea of 'British businesses' in one of the possible Customs arrangements.

Now that the figure has now been invented by HMRC, it can be used by the gullible, and Jeremiahs like cyclops, to browbeat us into staying in the European Union.
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 12:58 PM BST
Too many nows, apologies
Report lfc1971 June 4, 2018 12:59 PM BST
I don't know jed, perhaps he can answer
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 1:04 PM BST
Again cyclops, the £8.6bn is a real figure - it is the difference between our real contribution to the EU budget and our real returned income from the EU - it is easy to calculate accurately.

Your 20bn is an invented figure arrived at by the HMRC, who presumably were the ones advising Osborne when he told us how a Leave vote would improverish us all to within an inch of our lives.

And while we're at it, making up numbers to suit our agenda, perhaps you would be kind enough to dig out an estimate - or the exact figure if it can be calculated - of how much it costs your precious British businesses to comply with EU regulations?

For example, just to quote one, how much has it cost British businesses to comply with MIFID II, possibly the most ludicrously over-arching piece of legislation ever devised by mankind?
Report lfc1971 June 4, 2018 1:05 PM BST
that might be a question that will remain nicely unanswered
Report lfc1971 June 4, 2018 1:05 PM BST
that might be a question that will remain nicely unanswered
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 1:09 PM BST
"Making up numbers to suit our agenda".

There you go again. I've made up nothing, while you go off on another tangent - HMRC were advising Osborne - rather than considering their findings rationally. "Invented figures" are all anyone can have regarding the future. But you'd have thought an estimation of the cost of a customs arrangement might well be fairly accurate coming from HMRC. They don't just throw figures around.

With regard to MIFID 11, I have absolutely no idea.
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 1:10 PM BST
They don't just throw figures around.

And yet here they are, throwing figures around. Figures which you admit are merely projections, and which you are using to buttress your argument as if they were cold hard facts.
Report lfc1971 June 4, 2018 1:11 PM BST
there we go no answers, oh well
sometimes the question is more important than the answer
more enlightening
Report lfc1971 June 4, 2018 1:14 PM BST
lets say the estimates are wrong, its possible, lets pretend it is right

who we pay the £20 billion to? ( or whatever figure it is)
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 1:14 PM BST
Tell you what cyclops, do a bit of research into MIFID II.
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 1:17 PM BST
It's not "us" paying the money. It's the estimated cost to UK business of complying with customs regulations. A huge burden on UK business, if anywhere near true.

jed, why not enlighten us all about MIFID 11?
Report lfc1971 June 4, 2018 1:18 PM BST
nonsense, british business is us

who do we pay the 20 billion to?
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 1:22 PM BST
The post-Brexit customs arrangement favoured by leading Brexiteers could cost businesses up to £20bn a year, HMRC has said.

The organisation’s chief executive, Jon Thompson, told MPs the option of a “highly streamlined customs arrangement” would be significantly more costly than a more comprehensive customs partnership – the other option ministers are considering.

He said HMRC had estimated the cost to businesses of having to complete customs declaration forms after Brexit as £32.50 per shipment. There are around 200 million exports from Britain to the EU each year, meaning the total cost of customs declarations for UK firms would be £6.5bn each year. EU companies would have to pay a similar amount, taking the overall cost to £13bn.

Taking steps to meet EU regulations would cost businesses “several billion pounds more”, Mr Thompson said, raising the total cost of the customs arrangement to between £17bn and £20bn.
Report lfc1971 June 4, 2018 1:26 PM BST
everyone has read that

Who do we pay the £ 20 billion to ?
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 1:27 PM BST
estimated
several billion pounds more

Made-up numbers.

cyclops is ignoring your question lfc, because he knows the answer only too well.
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 1:31 PM BST
Can't put it any plainer than the article above.
If you don't understand I can't help.

What would your numbers be, jed, for that scenario?
Report lfc1971 June 4, 2018 1:34 PM BST
Happy
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 1:39 PM BST
The question lfc asked you is this:

You say, or more accurately you regurgitate the estimated figure quoted by the HMRC, that it will cost British Businesses 20bn. And yet the piece you have pasted in there clearly states that European businesses will pay at least 7bn of that.

You see, I am no economist, and I have just saved British businesses 7bn a year of the 20bn you have been quoting.
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 1:40 PM BST
Sorry, started one reply then spotted the glaring error in your numbers and had to reply to that.

Lfc is asking you, if we are to pay 20bn, to whom will we pay it? A perfectly reasonable question I would have thought, answer in your own time.
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 1:42 PM BST
When HMRC estimates that one of the preferred customs arrangements will cost UK business £20 billion, for example, this is lumped into the "Project Fear" category by many, rather than the astonishing claim being examined in any detail.

He said HMRC had estimated the cost to businesses of having to complete customs declaration forms after Brexit as £32.50 per shipment. There are around 200 million exports from Britain to the EU each year, meaning the total cost of customs declarations for UK firms would be £6.5bn each year. EU companies would have to pay a similar amount, taking the overall cost to £13bn.

Two self-contradictory statements.
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 1:46 PM BST
It is UK business that will pay the sum, not "we" if by that you mean the UK government. Money paid to the customs authorities, etc.

As for the £7bn you've "saved", unfortunately that will be passed onto UK consumers and businesses. Moving from an arrangement which is currently free to one where there are substantial costs will not benefit the country that is responsible for imposing those costs.

How are the above statements contradictory?
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 1:50 PM BST
Bloody hell, you quoted a cost to British businesses of 20bn, and the very piece you posted in support of that nonsense clearly - and I mean clearly - contradicts that idea.

So which is it to be - will it cost UK businesses 13bn, or 20bn?
Report lfc1971 June 4, 2018 1:53 PM BST
and once he manages to understand that
To whom do we pay the 6, 7 , 13 , 20 billion?
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 1:54 PM BST
We may be here a while I think lfc, while cyclops runs off to Remain Central to be told the answers.
Report InsiderTrader June 4, 2018 1:59 PM BST
Goods we export are 20% of the £240bn we export (80% are services).

https://fullfact.org/europe/uk-eu-trade/

This is £44bn a year and HRMC reckon it will cost £20bn to process those goods.

Is this cost the same for exports to ROW currently. About a 50% markup to just customs costs?
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 2:00 PM BST
HMRC don't just throw figures around you know Insider Trader.
Report InsiderTrader June 4, 2018 2:21 PM BST
I am not saying they are. Maybe it is because they would need massive infrastructure and training costs. But as they are quoting this as an annual cost I am not so sure.
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 2:24 PM BST
Sorry IT, that was an ironic reference to cyclops' ridiculous claim from earlier in the thread.
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 2:41 PM BST
It was not my claim, it was HMRC's
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 2:43 PM BST
You claimed that HMRC don't throw figures around, the HMRC claimed the customs arrangements would cost British businesses 20bn.

Both claims are bogus.
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 2:55 PM BST
How do you know?
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 2:57 PM BST
Because I can read mate.
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 3:01 PM BST
You read what you what to read and seem to ignore the rest.
Report InsiderTrader June 4, 2018 3:05 PM BST
cyclops,

The key to this is to question everything.

I dont trust the UK government, the EU or the civil servants on Brexit.

You need to dig into the numbers they produce and see if they can possibily be right and make your own judgements.
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 3:15 PM BST
Not sure how one would set about that. How would you dispute them?

I quite understand the lack of trust you refer to, but these are the people who are delivering Brexit (or not, as appears to be the case at present).

I was not putting those figures up as indisputable, simply that, if they are anything like correct, and HMRC are calculating practical costs, not ideologies, these figures are huge for UK business. Concern over these costs would partly explain why Business is all but unanimous in opposing Brexit, other than the inventor and the bloke with the mullet.
Report lfc1971 June 4, 2018 3:16 PM BST
^ there we go , more nonsense
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 3:21 PM BST
cyclops, as far as I can remember business did not have a vote in the Referendum - only individual people were asked to decide our fate.

They decided it, definitively. And now you and your friends think that your opinion and prognostications of disaster trump that decision. It does, and will, not.
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 3:22 PM BST
HMRC - my friends?
Not that powerful, I'm afraid.
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 3:34 PM BST
I meant all your Remain friends, I dson't think the HMRC has any friends, apart of course from the CEOs of all the major corporations from which it demands very little or no tax.
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 3:41 PM BST
You're right, though. Business did not have a vote.
Which is one reason why it was such a bad idea to have a referendum.
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 3:43 PM BST
It was a bad idea to ask the people by whom they wish to be governed? Only in your world mate.
Report Foinavon June 4, 2018 3:46 PM BST
HMRC said it could cost 20 billion. My interpretation of "could" is that it won't, the chances that it will are vanishingly small. All large companies have sales departments with staff who do nothing but fill in tax forms and invoices, an extra box or two to fill in makes little to no difference. They already do it for exports to non-EU countries.
The civil service seems to have a remainer fifth column determined to stop or water down Brexit. Perhaps they worry that they will have to do a proper job instead of deferring to Brussels.
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 3:50 PM BST
No, it was Theresa May who asked the people who they wanted to be governed by and they couldn't decide so she bought her power with taxpayers money from some strange people in Northern Ireland.

A bad idea to ask for a simple yes or no to an infinitely complex question.

Those running businesses would generally have been far better informed about the costs and implications than those who have no such experience. That said, the main frustration of business is that we STILL have no idea what's going to happen. Time for Brexiteers to get their act together.
Report Foinavon June 4, 2018 3:59 PM BST
Those strange people in Northern Ireland are British citizens.
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 4:00 PM BST
Still strange
Report Foinavon June 4, 2018 4:04 PM BST
They were voted into office by British people and usually vote the same way in Parliament as the Tories.
Some may find that strange.
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 4:06 PM BST
No, the strange part is their views on abortion, creationism, homosexuality and climate change.
Report Foinavon June 4, 2018 4:08 PM BST
Yes, I find that strange too.
Report cyclops June 4, 2018 4:15 PM BST
Returning to your post above, even if you ignore the EU companies' costs and ignore the "complying with EU Regulations" costs, you're still looking at £32.50 x 200 million for the declarations alone, which is £6.5 billion, close to our annual contribution to the EU.
Why do you think these figures would be skewed or misrepresented by HMRC?
Report jed.davison June 4, 2018 4:17 PM BST
I don't necessarily believe that, I merely pointed out that they had been skewed or misrepresented by you.
Report Foinavon June 4, 2018 6:11 PM BST
Companies have to create invoices already, how it could cost them £32.5 for an extra piece of information on a computerised form is not stated. It may take a bit of someone's time initially to set up or modify a form for each customer/product, but once created it's there for all subsequent deliveries.
Report dave1357 June 11, 2018 2:23 PM BST
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/jun/11/
rees-mogg-no-need-for-customs-checks-at-dover-in-no-deal-brexit

Either clueless or a bare-faced liar!
Report InsiderTrader June 11, 2018 2:43 PM BST
Very few from outside the EU are subject to checks at the ports. You think they go through every box on containers of toys etc from China? If there are issues they got picked up later down the line not at the port.
Report dave1357 June 11, 2018 2:53 PM BST
You can't have special treatment for one country under wto rules - we covered this in the RoI discussion.
Report InsiderTrader June 11, 2018 3:50 PM BST
Thats the point Dave. Very little is actually checked from non-EU countries so very little would have to be checked from EU countries. So far we have had 2 years to upgrade the customs at the ports.

WTO tariffs average 2-3 percent. We start with same regulations as well so no problems there.
Report Wallflower June 11, 2018 9:26 PM BST
Oh that's a great idea.

So UK will allow non-EU and EU goods full access across their borders with no requirement the other way (its up to them according to Rees-Mogg). Excellent, UK businesses will love that.

The EU (in Ireland) probably have no problem putting up a border now. Rees-Mogg is right after all - the man is nothing short of a genius.
Report donny osmond June 13, 2018 1:48 PM BST
++BREAKING++

Jacob Rees-Mogg setting up feeder investment fund in Dublin “to avoid post #brexit passporting & other associated costs with doing business in a UK outside the EU”.




couldnt make it up.....
Report JOMO July 4, 2018 1:55 PM BST
Gove is now in to 6/1 on the exchanges, and 5/1 level pegging with SJ with most books, to be next PM.
While TM has apparently come up with a best-of-both-worlds cu approach - which presumably makes enough concessions to prevent Gove from actually ripping this one up - Friday could nevertheless produce some fireworks.
The possibility of a resignation or two is being banded about, but does this have the potential to prompt an actual leadership overthrow?
Esther's distorting the next-to-go market with her gaffe this week, but I have to say I quite like Gove to leave next at 25/1 (Korals). DD has been very quiet recently and has presumably had some sort of say in shaping the latest approach (call me crazy?!) so my hunch is he won't resign. And I think BJ's quite happy making his feelings clear from within the Cabinet. Gove, however, has done a bit of porridge being nice and loyal and towing the line, so may find it beneficial to back to the backbenches for a bit to turn up the heat on TM while removing himself from any direct flack the Govt gets between now and March?
Report politicspunter July 4, 2018 2:24 PM BST
I have to disagree that Gove could resign. He has taken backstabbing to a new level and has always had an eye on the top job. If he were to resign now, his large loyal following of party members would find it very hard to forgive him but not as much as his fellow mps whose support he will need to get to the final two in any leadership election.
I don't count BJ or JRM and I'm not all that keen on SJ either although his popularity is on the up with the membership in the most recent poll. Hunt will be there or thereabouts. I have Gove and him as the two front runners with Penny Mordaunt as a live outsider.
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